Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

. Richards, The Changing Structure of a Ganda Village: Kisozi, 1892–1952 , Nairobi, EAPH, 1966 ; M. Ainsworth, Infancy in Uganda: Infant Care and the Growth of Love, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press, 1967 44 C. Summers, ‘Radical Rudeness: Ugandan Social Critiques in the 1940s’, Journal of Social

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual

could she be called a West Indian? Rhys herself was uncertain at times, and some of her critics have hotly debated the question. There is no doubt of her love for the disturbing beauty of her native Dominica, a recurrent if occasional theme from her earliest stories onwards, evoked most powerfully in her final novel, Wide Sargasso Sea . Yet in all her writing about the island there is the sense

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45

automatically taught patriotism. I don’t think things were always rosy, because before I was married in 1934, I remember one Friday afternoon everything was done and I had a bright class of boys … they’d call them junior high today – they were ready for high school. And I said, ‘Right, now you can have a concert’, and they always loved a concert and I always tried

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Visions of history, visions of Britain

published in 1992 after James’s death, was a pioneering work in many ways; not least in its analysis of ‘popular culture’ – cinema, comic books, radio serials, mass-market fiction – as a key to understanding British society. These were also seminal, turbulent years in James’s personal life. In 1939 in Manchester, he met and fell in love with the eighteen-year old Constance Duckfoot

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain

impulse in realizing that the book is by an American negro is to inquire into its good taste. Not until we are satisfied that his work does not overstep the barriers which a not quite explicable but deep instinct in us is ever alive to maintain can we judge it with genuine fairness. Mr. Claude McKay never offends our sensibilities. His love poetry is clear of the hint which would

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

increasingly mass nationalist movement. In 1911, the visit of George V was used as an opportunity to counter the propaganda of Indian nationalism. The King announced the reunification of Bengal, bonuses for military and civilian servants of the government, and grants for educational advancement. 8 The durbar invoked the mythology of the patriot king, the Great (White) King who loved and protected his subjects

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

’. Anderson has drawn attention to cases of colonized peoples ‘who have every reason to feel hatred for their imperialist rulers’ instead being inspired by the power of patriotism and racism to ‘love and often profoundly self-sacrificing love’. 1 In the case of the formation of the IODE, it was Anglo-Celtic ‘colonials’ who did not feel hatred for their rulers, as they were ‘white settlers

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

black American experience, ‘Frog Perspectives.’ This is the phrase that I’ve borrowed from Nietzsche to describe someone looking from below upward, a sense of someone who feels himself lower than others… A certain degree of hate combined with love (ambivalence) is always involved in this looking from

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)

extraordinary imperial panorama, set at the time of Waterloo. The novel is permeated with empire – from Sambo, the Sedleys’ grinning black footman who appears on the very first page, to Jos Sedley who has made his fortune in India, the Irish Colonel O’Dowd and his vulgar wife Peggy, to the hypocritical Pitt Crawley, friend of Wilberforce, with his love for Negro emancipation, the Chickasaw Indians and the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)

: I went to my grandchildren’s school for Christmas, and there was a lot of controversy about the school’s being Christian when we have so many ethnics coming in. And I went to that programme and people who had the highest profile positions in those plays and concerts that they put on were the Indians, the Orientals, the whole bit. They loved it. You

in Female imperialism and national identity