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Rachel E. Hile

for satirical readings or uses of Spenserian intertexts. Analyzing Thomas Nashe’s Choise of Valentines with reference to Spenser’s “March” eclogue from The Shepheardes Calender and Tailboys Dymoke’s Caltha Poetarum alongside Spenser’s Muiopotmos gives a sense of the code of indirect satire as a flexible vocabulary of subterfuge and innuendo. In Nashe’s, Dymoke’s, and (in the chapter’s “coda”) Shakespeare’s responses to and reworkings of Spenserian images and narratives, we see the overwhelming significance of Spenser in the literary field of the 1590s. Hunting love

in Spenserian satire
Steve Sohmer

Many Shakespeareans rankled at the final scene of the motion picture Shakespeare in Love (1998). Having lost his Viola (Gwyneth Paltrow) to Lord Wessex (Colin Firth), young Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) sets quill to paper to capture her spirit in a new play. Here’s how Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard wrote the scene 1

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

: ‘Ivor Brown thinks she was Anne Whateley; perhaps “Rosalind” is a clue: the Rosalinds of Romeo and Juliet and of Love’s Labour’s Lost are both black beauties.’ 22 All such finger-pointing culminated in Rowse’s announcement in 1963 that Emilia Lanier was the dark lady. Since which date criticism of and hostility towards Rowse

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

Shakespeare rehearsed his portrayal of Nashe in Love’s Labour’s Lost ; he wrote a warm, light-hearted miniature of his friend into the character of Moth (an anagram of Thom). Like Thom, Moth is small of stature, sharp of mind and tongue, and a masterful debunker of ignorance as personified by his master, the original bloviating ignoramus, Don Adriano de Armado. The play was written in

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

’s Fedele and Fortunio , image-breaking is shown onstage, as Victoria, her servant Allia and the witch Medusa, disguised as ‘Nunnes’, burn and ‘prick’ a ‘waxen Image’, which has also been inscribed with Victoria’s name, and the names of spirits, as part of a love spell. 11 This act of ritualised image-breaking significantly recalls instances in which images of Elizabeth I were dissolved in corrosive

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Personal Shakespeare
Steve Sohmer

understood much more truly than he has been. 1 I hope we now better understand Shakespeare’s best-known, best-loved comedy as a more personal play – and Shakespeare as a more personal writer – than we have imagined. Note

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

heaven or hell. 16 Marking the anniversary of a loved one’s death, perhaps first commended to early Christians by Tertullian (AD 211), remained then as now a rite of respect for the deceased and a salutary exercise for the living. This tradition of annual commemorations, commonplace in early Tudor England, may have lost its standing in the liturgy but remained bright in living

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

Suppose I could convince you that William Shakespeare wrote Twelfth Night for a performance before Queen Elizabeth I on Twelfth Night, 6 January 1601/02? Suppose I demonstrated that Shakespeare laced his play with anagrams because the Queen loved word-games, and anagrams were all the rage at Court? What if I persuaded you that Thomas Nashe

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

heroine Leila is already disguised in boy’s clothing, has taken the name Fabio, and is employed as a page by her beloved Flamminio, who is lovesick for Isabella, who scorns him but lusts for Leila-Fabio. A similar love triangle appears in Twelfth Night with Viola-Cesario as the hypotenuse. The Italian play also includes wily servants, silly old men, and the timely return of

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

In 1991 another quasi-religious epiphany struck Inge Leimberg: ‘What Malvolio ought to have seen at a glance ... is his own image mirrored in a very simple anagram reflecting the creed of man fallen off from the love of God and thrown into the outer darkness of self-love: “ Eritis sicut deus ,” says the devil, and Adam homo promptly replies: I’M A & O!’ [Alpha and Omega

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind