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Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

Security Baseline Assessment for Sudan and South Sudan, 2014 : 6). After partially evacuating its team on 20 December, MSF-H adapted its operations to the new context: the organisation deployed a new team to Bentiu State Hospital to support surgical activities managed by the hospital’s regular staff and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). It also set up a primary healthcare clinic inside the local Protection of Civilians (PoC) site, run and secured by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), where about 8,000 people had sought shelter amid

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

communities affected by disaster. Following the work of organisations including the CDAC Network, Internews and BBC Media Action, we know that this is a vital form of aid: people need information as they need water, food, medicine and shelter. Information can save lives, build resilience, support livelihoods and empower ( Hannides, 2015 : 9). Information provision should be prioritised within all humanitarian responses. In addition, international journalism about humanitarian disasters needs financial support. This content is incredibly important but

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

-chain authentication as a means of managing aid and work entitlements ( Dodgson and Genc, 2017 ). Solar power lighting and charging solutions are widely marketed together with portable ceramic water filtration systems ( Redfield, 2015 ). Replacing a need for medically-staffed feeding centres, take-away mother-administered therapeutic foods to tackle malnutrition are now common ( Scott-Smith, 2013 ). Making good the paucity of health and educational services, e-medicine and e-learning smart phone apps are being widely trialled. While these are only a few of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)

, 2016). Social inequalities have been reified; even most left-wing progressive movements no longer see them as something that needs to be abolished but instead as something to be managed. Within this political economy, openness – particularly when interpreted as an appeal to transparency as means to unmask inequalities and corruption – assumes the role that gallantry had in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: while seemingly easing the relationship between women and men, but not also between the rich and the poor, it can also be associated with a system that

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
Religious influences on the depictions of science in mainstream movies

16 Playing God: religious influences on the depictions of science in mainstream movies David A. Kirby, Amy C. Chambers Research on public attitudes towards science has revealed that individuals’ personal values and belief system are crucial factors in determining how they respond to new developments in science, technology and medicine, such as nanotechnology (Brossard et al., 2009; Nisbet and Scheufele, 2009; Scheufele et al., 2009; Toumey, 2011). Few cultural institutions have more influence on personal values and belief systems than religion, and few cultural

in Science and the politics of openness
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EAST TIMOR WAS forcibly incorporated into Indonesia in 1975 and managed, through a confluence of circumstances that was at once remarkable and yet another example of a suppressed people snapping back like bent but unbroken twigs (to use Isaiah Berlin’s phrase), to become independent almost twenty-five years later. Now the territory, poised on the edge of statehood, is undergoing transition, but also flux and confusion. At the time of writing the United Nations Transitional Authority for East Timor (UNTAET) is effectively the Government of

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
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The beast that no-one could – or should – control?

because academics are largely ignorant of the cost of journal subscriptions, which are Open access 41 normally managed on their behalf by university librarians. Although the direction of travel is away from subscription models towards a totally open-access world, the details of the transition remain obscure and mired in enduring arguments between various stakeholders. Economic modelling suggests that a fully open-access publishing system could deliver savings by creating a market where there is genuine competition for publishing services (Swan and Houghton, 2012

in Science and the politics of openness
Competing imaginaries of science and social order in responsible (research and) innovation

200805. Beal, T. K. (2014). Religion and Its Monsters. New York: Routledge. Berg, P. (2008). Meetings that changed the world: Asilomar 1975 – DNA modification secured. Nature, 455(7211), 290–291. Botting, F. (2003). Metaphors and monsters. Journal for Cultural Research, 7(4), 339–365. Braidotti, R. (1996). Signs of wonder and traces of doubt: On teratology and embodied differences. In N. Lykke and R. Braidotti (eds), Between Monsters, Goddesses and Cyborgs: Feminist Confrontations with Science, Medicine and Cyberspace (pp. 135–152). London: Zed. Bruening, G., and Lyons

in Science and the politics of openness
New Labour and public sector reform

, crucial roles were performed by the three key (and interlinked) elements of the so-called ‘quasi-market’, choice, competition and commercial involvement in supply. Choice Labour’s 1945 settlement was (in Tony Blair’s words) ‘largely statedirected and managed, built on a paternalist relationship between state and individual, one of donor and recipient [one in which] personal preferences were a low or non-existent priority’ (Blair 2002). The outcome was an asymmetrical power relationship in which user needs and preferences were often neglected. There were two available

in In search of social democracy

see that the extent to which people incorporate medical advice is not the responsibility of the patient alone. It’s a problem of the doctor–patient relationship’. For Anderson, a Koori medical practitioner trained in conventional Western medicine, health practices in a community of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people must involve processes of mutual recognition and negotiation of ‘healing strategies’ (1994: 42). In this context the operation of the community-managed Aboriginal Medical Service is particularly important. A loose national

in Human rights and the borders of suffering