Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

-income countries, late forties, early fifties, they would be helped to some extent by vaccines, but they will usually succumb not to infections but to injury, road-traffic accidents, violence and, in women, complications of labour – and there is a surgical fix to those. I think the innovations in medicine may need to come conceptually and in the way things are presented; in order to understand that you should really focus on outcome. It is a philosophical approach: whether or not you should just do

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War
Xavier Crombé and Joanna Kuper

operations to the new context: the organisation deployed a new team to Bentiu State Hospital to support surgical activities managed by the hospital’s regular staff and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). It also set up a primary healthcare clinic inside the local Protection of Civilians (PoC) site, run and secured by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), where about 8,000 people had sought shelter amid tensions and fear between the different

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

. , 2016 ). Digitisation – the collection, conversion, storage and sharing of data and the use of digital technologies to collect and manage information about individuals from affected communities – increasingly shapes understandings of need and the response to emergencies. 2 This use of digital technologies produces ‘digital bodies’ – images, information, biometrics and other data stored in digital space – that represent, track, quantify and monitor the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

non-emergency-related texts for no payment. An unpaid, voluntary innovation became one where translators felt taken for granted or even exploited. If information is a form of aid, then it comes at a cost, just like water, food, medicine and other supplies, and the free provision of information should not be assumed, even in a crisis. Indeed, the long-term needs of the crisis-affected community might be served better by NGOs and other actors providing paid work to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

communities affected by disaster. Following the work of organisations including the CDAC Network, Internews and BBC Media Action, we know that this is a vital form of aid: people need information as they need water, food, medicine and shelter. Information can save lives, build resilience, support livelihoods and empower ( Hannides, 2015 : 9). Information provision should be prioritised within all humanitarian responses. In addition, international journalism about humanitarian disasters needs financial support. This content is incredibly important but

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, improving customer value and effectively managing competitive risk ( Keohane, 2013 ; Quitzau, 2010 ; Tidd et al. , 2001 ). There are many parallels between the evolution of innovation practice within the private sector and that of the humanitarian sector. Chesbrough (2006) used the term ‘open innovation’ to explain the shift in the way companies had been innovating. Historically, businesses attempted to internalise the creative and innovative process, funding large research

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

-chain authentication as a means of managing aid and work entitlements ( Dodgson and Genc, 2017 ). Solar power lighting and charging solutions are widely marketed together with portable ceramic water filtration systems ( Redfield, 2015 ). Replacing a need for medically-staffed feeding centres, take-away mother-administered therapeutic foods to tackle malnutrition are now common ( Scott-Smith, 2013 ). Making good the paucity of health and educational services, e-medicine and e-learning smart phone apps are being widely trialled. While these are only a few of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

’ obligations in the field. It is true, indeed, that Hippocratic medicine was also founded on the ­available – hence, surely not 100 per cent complete – evidence-based knowledge.2 As interestingly argued by one author, who relied on the rhetorical theory, ‘all theoretical discussions of international law are incomplete in one way or the other,’ and the reason is that theorists ‘choose,’ they emphasise different aspects of the discipline.3 To paraphrase the most common definition of VAW – violence against women is a violation of women’s human rights – violence against women

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

equipped to welcome her and her dis­abled child. Even after she did manage to leave the apartment where they lived, her husband continued to stalk and beat her, as ten medical certificates demonstrated. She claimed that her physical integrity, physical and mental health, and life were at 27 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 27 24/03/2020 11:01 Violence against women’s health in international law serious risk and that she lived in constant fear. Criminal and civil proceedings started against the husband, without success. A.T. complained that the state had failed to

in Violence against women’s health in international law