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Looking beyond the state

, Manchester University Press, 2005 ; Simon J. Potter, ‘Webs, Networks and Systems: Globalization and the Mass Media in the Nineteenth-and Twentieth-Century British Empire’, Journal of British Studies , 46, 2007 , pp. 621–46; Brett M Bennett and Joseph M. Hodge (eds.), Science and Empire: Knowledge and Networks of Science Across the British Empire, 1800

in Beyond the state

was becoming a mass, democratic society – symbolised by the abolition of the House of Lords’ legislative veto power (1911), the enfranchisement of women over thirty (1919), and the development of a modern mass media. As David Cannadine has argued, these transformations made the monarchy a greater novelty, with Buckingham Palace becoming a tourist trap rather than a centre of power, and royal memorabilia

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

.1 Itinerary of the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour of Canada Each of the parties involved in organizing the tour, from the IODE and the SOSBW to the Canadian and British Governments, had its own particular great hope for the tour. Such enthusiasm on an imperial and a national scale contrasted with the media attention. A wide selection of

in Female imperialism and national identity
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Visions of history, visions of Britain

’s contemptuous rejection of the ‘piece of paper’ Hitler offered him at Munich plunged Britain into war in the autumn of 1938. James’s Atlantic crossing had to be cancelled, and he spent most of the 1940s and 1950s as a British resident. For much of that period, he was a full-time political activist in tiny far-left groups. The mass of political material he wrote during these years, both alone and in

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Defending Cold War Canada

the postwar years saw women’s place idealized, as wives and mothers women were simultaneously accorded a part to play in promoting good citizenship. The IODE believed that Communism within Canada posed a severe threat to Canadian citizenship, and its women and mothers sought to rigorously ‘sweep away the Communist stain’. It did this through its work in the areas of education, media relations, civil

in Female imperialism and national identity
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consciousness… [a] refusal to localise the centre of interest in a single character or a limited set of characters…’. 37 It involved engaging in ‘the creative power of mass… [as]… the central character’, 38 a position which Lamming acknowledged owed its influence to C. L. R. James. 39 It involved, above all, a consistent reworking of the colonial relationship, and of the state of exile as a complex

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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remained – and remain – culturally relevant long past the end of empire. Chapter 4 explores how a modern politics and mass culture were mobilised by Western-educated respectables of colour in southern Africa and the British Raj to make claim on Britishness and imperial citizenship. In particular, it explores how historical actors such as Francis Z. S. Peregrino, Viswanath

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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from home that littered the veld at every camp site. It was the first dramatic test of the new mass literacy, this orgy of letter writing by the working class.’ 3 Tabitha Jackson concurs; she claims that Forster’s Education Act of 1870 had provided a framework for compulsory elementary education, and that the literacy rate had grown from 63.3 per cent in 1841 to 92.2 per cent in 1900. The war, she

in The Victorian soldier in Africa

, conducted James Massie through its streets. The major had difficulty in making sense of the sights they encountered: What do you call this low, crowded, and almost impenetrable mass of ruinous huts and rude sheds … with so many entirely naked, squalid, and dirty children running and scrambling about, that it is almost

in The other empire