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Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika

counsel’ with the aim of ‘attaining a common policy’ to present to government. 16 In 1934, the Tanganyika Mission Council (TMC) was established as the fulfilment of these ambitions. Its membership consisted of the main Protestant missions working in Tanganyika, thereby frustrating efforts to create a truly pan-mission representative organisation. The Roman Catholic Church had declined to participate

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

introduction of improving entertainment. Primarily, though, they would ‘separate the healthy from the sick’, with viama membership dependent on a negative STI test. Members would wear a badge, inform on neighbours who were infected with STIs and agree not to pay or receive money for sex. The real target of the campaign would be ‘the worst offenders, the prostitute and the men of similar character. These

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)

, the IODE has found many of its initial concerns to have been accomplished, or else professionalized, while others have been found to be no longer appropriate. Concern over an ageing demographic emerged in the mid-1960s, when the IODE asked ‘Are we dinosaurs?’ 1 The longevity of the IODE is impressive, and although membership never again reached the heights attained in the First World War and

in Female imperialism and national identity
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain

McKay. His membership of the WSF provided McKay with important insights into the politics of the metropolis. He found himself in ‘the nest of extreme radicalism in London’. He got to know the politics and personalities of Britain’s far-left groups. He also became acquainted with different sections of the trade union movement – especially with the shop stewards, which appealed to

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

involving Britain’s antipodean Empire in unity, Clark Murray’s empire-wide ambitions included plans to set up an imperial chapter in London as soon as possible. 12 That ambition, however, tested the limits of ‘Empire unity’ for a Britain that still considered itself the superior core of that Empire. Clark Murray’s ambitions of empire-wide membership were soon crushed, blocked by the rival British

in Female imperialism and national identity
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge

Memorialization was also achieved through the process of naming . Many IODE chapters were named after war heroes or military contingents, while others took the names of battalions to which they were attached. Special ‘memorial chapters’ were formed, such as the Silver Cross Chapter in Ottawa, membership of which was restricted to those women to whom the Silver Cross had been awarded in memory of husbands

in Female imperialism and national identity
Organizing principles, 1900–1919

that this will be an opportunity [for] every Canadian woman to show her loyalty and devotion to the Empire and most fitting as it is the woman’s part to minister to the sick and wounded.’ 45 The privileged social position of IODE members was important in its war work. As noted in the previous chapter, membership was at its most elitist at the beginning of the First World War. More generally at the time

in Female imperialism and national identity
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples

his family, and largely sustained by subscriptions which he solicited from supportive church groups supplemented by his own money. The paid-up membership of the League never rose above a few hundred and The Keys , its journal, had a similarly small circulation; expenditure invariably outstripped income. The LCP executive was mainly West Indian with some Africans and an occasional Asian member

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
The canadianizing 1920s

maternal care givers of a private domain was increasingly professionalized. Increased state involvement led to multiple positionings for the IODE. The new bureaucracy involved collaboration between voluntary and state interests, and the IODE positioned itself in both arenas. An added benefit was that among the IODE membership were ‘insiders’, prominent members such as Charlotte Whitton and

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

Through Miss Arnoldi, the SOSBW asked the IODE if it would cooperate in a tour and a situation agreeable to both parties was worked out. Enthusiasm was subsequently gauged from the IODE’s cross-Canada membership, the response being one of ‘hearty endorsement’. 17 The IODE had the additional intention that, after the tour, having worked positively with the SOSBW, it would become the sole

in Female imperialism and national identity