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, it is also possible to think of the self, that subject, as emerging through these stories and narrations. As such, narratives of the past must make space for the differentiated individual, so that all meaning and sense of identification is not lost. The view that memory is therefore a focus for struggle centred around power will evidently be seen, as the villagers of Diyalivtsi use narratives of border crossing not only to re-engage with the past, but also to construct views of it which challenge those produced on a national level in Ukraine since 1991. In a sense

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland

region there are assemblies which perform mediation in case of conflicts and prevent or mediate in existing blood feuds.  7 Following Benhabib’s approach to the ‘narrative constitution of the self’ (2002: 15–16), which explores the individual agency associated with engaging with and transforming (collective) narratives, and Sieder’s (2008) analytic disentangling of narratives as sequences of decisions, I consider genealogical narratives as a form of agency.  8 http://www.sarapi.org.  9 The Montenegrin term bratstvo comprises all sub-branches of a patrilineage sharing a

in Migrating borders and moving times
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia

of the ethnic Malay majority in the fledgling nation’s new constitution.9 Thus, the historiography of the Japanese occupation accords primacy to the Malay ethnic majority’s collective memory of the war. This dominant narrative promotes the occupation as a catalyst in the awakening of Malay nationalism, leading to decolonization and self-determination.10 Experiences that diverge from the national narrative are marginalized, including the suppression of Japanese atrocities during the occupation. This chapter explores three selected exhumations dating from the

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
A war of extermination, grave looting, and culture wars in the American West

Spanish teaching lazy Indians how to ‘work hard’ in the eighteenth century to pictures of happy tribal self-government today. The upbeat version of the ‘California Story’ as a place of entrepreneurial ingenuity and cutting-edge modernity numbs us to the state’s bloody history. This practice of ‘scrupulous forgetting’, to use German historian Jörg Wollenberg’s phrase, is echoed in California’s sanitized public history that erases its tragic past, turning profound injustices into a narrative of progress. In this respect, California echoes Turkey’s official amnesia about

in Human remains and identification
Integrative concepts for a criminology of mass violence

demand further analysis. Not only must one explain the crimes inherent in the production of the corpse (that is, homicide), but one must also account for the morally difficult task of corpse disposal by perpetrators, onlookers and the families of victims. Furthermore, in an age when advances in forensic techniques render sites of disposal and the corpse itself increasingly ‘eloquent’, the post-conflict investigation of atrocity may reactivate trauma and force actors implicated in murder to revisit and modify narratives of moral denial. In contexts where some form of

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Crossing borders, changing times

(Hareven 1991) and neighbourhoods, or of play and illness. Such times exist parallel to clock time and national time, as people owe allegiance to multiple, layered time-spaces, as already noted. They overlap, and are variously invoked and prioritised, depending on the context. While such personal time-spaces may fit into national narratives, they may also challenge national time-spaces, especially when related to border-crossers’ experiences, as we outline later. First, however, we consider how time constitutes a central element in defining Self and Other across bordered

in Migrating borders and moving times
Embodying the disappeared of the Argentinian dictatorship through law

lasts forever. What lasts forever is that a person I can name is neither present nor absent.… The disappeared “is” in the middle of neither, nor.’10 It is thus a question of reversal: if the nature of war is to turn the corpse of the Other (‘the enemy without’) into a trophy and a proof of victory, then, conversely, the nature of the policy of enforced disappearance is to turn the corpse of the Self (‘the enemy within’) into an absence, a non-fact, a neither–nor – a double negative that strangely recalls the NN of Nomen nescio11 or the ­Hitlerian Nacht und Nebel

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Portraying the exhumation and reburial of Polish Jewish Holocaust victims in the pages of yizkor books

token, Laksman’s account also demonstrates a large measure of gratitude for the numerous Polish officials who helped him fulfil his duty to bury his fellow Jews with dignity. The general image of Poles in yizkor books is negative, but without the assistance of Poles, Laksman’s mission would have been unfeasible. Perhaps there is a glimmer of hope, Laksman seems to imply, for cooperation between Jews and Poles in tending to the memory of the Holocaust. In this regard, though, Laksman’s voice is singular. Moreover, Laksman’s narrative does not appear in isolation; it is

in Human remains and identification
Massacres, missing corpses, and silence in a Bosnian community

accurate and public record of which would have been deeply threatening the post-war communist authorities, to be pushed more easily into the shadows. What was paramount to the communists in the first decades following the war was not confronting the complex nature of the mass violence during war. Rather, their main task was to construct a heroic master narrative about that conflict as a titanic struggle of the partisans versus foreign fascist occupiers and their domestic collaborators. The reality of the intimate mass killing among neighbours, the traumatic experience of

in Destruction and human remains
Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa

Spanish mass grave exhumations’, Memory Studies, 7:4 (2014), 440–56 Biwa, M., ‘“Weaving the past with threads of memory”: narratives and commemorations of the colonial war in Southern Namibia’ (unpublished PhD thesis, University of the Western Cape, 2012) Crossland, Z., ‘Acts of Estrangement: The Post-Mortem Making of the Self and Other’, Archaeological Dialogues, 16:1 (2009), 102–25 Crossland, Z., ‘Of clues and signs: the dead body’s evidential traces’, American Ethnologist, 1 (2009), 69–80 Crossland, Z., ‘Violent spaces: conflict over the reappearance of Argentina

in Human remains and identification