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. For Barbara Rosenblum, cancer itself did not particularly take on a positive aspect, but she drew something positive from it: ‘I have cancer Austerity baby but it is not consuming me. Rather, I am as alive as I can be; my creative juices have never been as electric; my thoughts have never been as clear.’ It seems clear that despite the dominant – and recommended – narratives of cancer, sometimes metaphors and images suggest themselves, emerging unexpectedly and perversely from deeper senses of the self. In my own case, although I must have been shocked at the

in Austerity baby
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parents were small children when antisemitic pogroms in Eastern Europe obliged the families to travel west. Now I began to see both how interesting these lives had been, and how the memory of forced exile persists through the generations. Although I have some resistance to the notion of ‘second-generation’ Holocaust survivors (that is their children, assumed to inherit their trauma at one remove), I am entirely persuaded by Marianne Hirsch’s notion of ‘postmemory’. Postmemory characterizes the experience of those who grow up dominated by narratives that preceded their

in Austerity baby
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living in Prestwich, near Bury Old Road (David with aspirations one day to move to Alderley Edge in Cheshire). His story illustrates the development of the Jewish communities of Crumpsall, Prestwich and Broughton Park by midcentury. In a parallel narrative of mobility, Howard Spring’s fabulous creation of 1934, Rachel Rosing, devotes her life to escaping her origins in Cheetham Hill, through seduction and marriage. Later, on the spur of the moment, she decides to board a tram to Cheetham Hill. Austerity baby [ 93 ] [ 94 ] Why not once more? ... Probably, she

in Austerity baby
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Times ’ editors intended the supplement to enable, not merely reflect, the widespread acceptance and legitimisation of therapeutic light – to cement the so-called innate connection between sunlight and health within the minds of its readership. This was no small feat. Light therapy was a self-styled ‘modern’ and progressive form of medical treatment that never possessed a stable or unchallenged reputation, however popular. As this book argues, the

in Soaking up the rays
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point. And, since it is also clear that we rewrite our own stories at different times in our lives, why not give up the pretence of an autobiographical ‘truth’? For this reason, I find most appealing those narratives with specific or even eccentric framing devices, permitting only partial views of the ‘self’. For example, Janet Berlo has organised her memoir, Quilting Lessons, around her practice as a quilter, describing the art itself, her friends and family, and her life as an art historian and academic. Deborah Tall’s memoir, From Where We Stand, is a lyrical

in Austerity baby
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: in the darkroom.  The dark room Pleasonton’s blue-light therapy was not, within the history of medicine, defined as ‘phototherapy’ (artificial light therapy) but rather referred to as chromotherapy or colour therapy, and for practitioners Pleasonton was perceived as an early pioneer in the therapeutic benefits of visible, coloured light. 17 As outlined in previous chapters, the historical narrative of

in Soaking up the rays
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extravagant claims that have been made for ray therapy as a curative agent on the one hand, and its disparagement as a useless means of self-deception and auto-suggestion on the other, the question of dosage requires serious consideration. 2 (William Beaumont, 1931) Out of darkness and mist emerges a ghostly disembodied arm

in Soaking up the rays