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Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

time and folds it back onto itself, creating connections and narratives out of disparate events. To illustrate this somewhat abstract point, a recent study suggests that designers of persuasive technologies (e.g. quantified self-tracking apps) falsely rely on the ‘egocentric loop’ (Balestrini, 2013: no pagination). The process from data collection, to visualisation, to self-awareness, does not smoothly nudge people towards actual behavioural change. Instead, intermittent feedback via affective relationships with other agents might be more helpful. Through vicarious

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

irretrievable process of producing an OSM map with a group of other volunteer mappers. As a self-described ‘intervention’, these narratives unfold, deconstruct and liquidise traditional spatial metaphors through a series of animated interjections – Gerlach offers an auto-ethnographic exploration of mapping focusing on the banality of logistics Introduction: mapping times 15 and equipment, while reflecting on the ideological and discursive nature of digital cartography. Together, these threads playfully ‘undo’ traditional conceptualisations of how mapping and cartographic

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

’ per second to more than nine billion could be interpreted, as per Virilio (1997) and Castells (1996), as evidence of the inexorable acceleration of technology (seen as a monolithic abstract entity) beyond the limits of human sense-experience, ‘a symptom of how human time is being lost to an inhuman, globalising, technological “time”’ (Mackenzie, 2002: 88). However, technicity in Simondon’s sense provides a way of thinking about this acceleration without resorting to pessimistic narratives based on an abstract opposition of society and technology. The regular rate of

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

of emphasising ‘intertextuality’ for Harley (1989) was the possibility of looking beyond the map maker’s intentions in order to find other, suppressed and competing, narratives. Here, this analogy of maps and texts by Harley will be revisited by examining maps through the lens of some recent ideas about literary criticism from ‘new materialists’, such as Bennet (2012), Harman (2012) and Hayles (2014). This will lead into a proposal for an object-oriented cartography in which maps again figure as texts, not with the purpose of deconstruction, but to argue against

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

the effect of the use of Google Earth in Crank is congruent with the general functions of maps in movies, which are: to claim the authenticity of a place, to serve as a narrative device in the form of cartographic intertitles, and to provide a jump effect, when a journey is traced on a map (Caquard, 2009). But there is more to it. In the case at hand the cartographic imagery is not just intertitle, or solely a jump effect. The geobrowser imagery itself becomes a motion picture technology. The sequence is inserted to establish a manipulation of the time axis through

in Time for mapping
A trialogue

, which were integral to the conversation, to one side. Instead we use a page layout inspired by the Chronicles of Eusebius. A first in layout design in the fifteenth century as the codex started to replace scrolls, these printed Chronicles showed a comparison of historical data with synchronous events depicted in tables for the first time. Eusebius’ aim was to establish the place of Christianity and also synchronise the chronologies of the historical narratives of several nations. His design used columns to transliterate between languages: Nineteen parallel columns

in Time for mapping

to bring forth through contact and feel differences infinitely multiplying’. However, simply because OSM relies on the work of amateurs themselves working through and generating vernacular sensibilities, 38 Ephemerality/mobility it does not follow therefore that some form of disciplining is absent from the practice of vernacular mapping. On the contrary, these vernacular impulses are trained by informal hierarchies of experience, technologies and conventions that promote a regime, or at least, a sensibility of self-governance and selfdiscipline. For example, in

in Time for mapping
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time

consumption, performance and negotiation associated with maps or mapping projects. In practical terms, a variety of methods are used to examine mapping processes. Kitchin, Gleeson and Dodge (2013) employ an insider ethnography to relate the dynamic process of data collection and map making/use/re-use/ re-authoring, akin to a diary or narrative journal of the life of their map(s). Through interviews and participant observation, Del Casino and Hanna (2006) used performative and ethnographic methods to explore their ‘map spaces’. Chris Perkins writes too that performative

in Time for mapping