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what that purpose consists of beyond the collective maintenance of a safe space, democratically self-governed. That seems a weak reed on which to support the heavy lifting of the liberal state. The intergenerational qualities of citizenship are central to Bauböck's analysis. Although those intergenerational qualities serve the interests of both the state and liberal conceptions of justice, it is not clear that they are necessary to community

in Democratic inclusion

Gonsalves, who took power in 2001 and is in his fourth term as I write. This range of literary genres – journal, memoir, novel-as-thriller and novel-as-fictionalised-memoir – gives rise to intriguing inter-textual considerations. Despite disparities in period, narrative perspective, implied readership and authorial position, thematic similarities and common literary devices are strongly

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

intricacies of ‘workers' self-management’, the rise of ethnopolitics in the Yugoslav public sphere in 1985–91 made studying Yugoslavia synonymous with studying ethnicity and nationalism even before the wars began. 1 The wars, and post-war ethnonationalist elites' persistence in power, tightened the bond further – as, when millions had been targeted for persecution because of ethnicised difference, they had to some extent to do. A field crossing history, anthropology, sociology and politics has debated how far twentieth-century notions of the relationship between ethnicity

in Race and the Yugoslav region

whiteness in societies where prevailing identity narratives position the nation ‘outside’ race, calls the ‘cultural archive’: the often everyday and ephemeral, but no less significant, sites that make explicit how deeply race has permeated constructions of individual and collective identity. The cultural archive, alongside ‘innocence’ (neither knowing nor wanting to know about racism) and ‘white Dutch self-representation’ (in which the national self belongs to Europe while national Others do not and cannot), is one of Wekker's three central concepts in

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
An epilogue

case that on the subcontinent, as elsewhere, the internal endeavors within modernisms to surpass the past, articulate the present, and envision the future have been intrinsically heterogeneous ones. 2 On the one hand, such initiatives have severally accessed and exceeded colonial representations and precolonial narratives, nationalist thought and nativist tradition, primitivism and futurity

in Subjects of modernity
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The beginning of aesthetic theory and the end of art

designates the recognition on our part that, as Pippin puts it, ‘we always require . . . a narrative account of why we have come to regard some set of rules or a practice as authoritative’ (Pippin 1999 p. 68). The idea of all-inclusive immanence therefore no longer forces one to invoke obscure notions like the ‘self-determination of the concept’, because what is at stake amounts to nothing more than the fact that legitimation of all kinds in modernity has to include reflection on the sources of our decisive notions in the concrete history of a human community. The task of

in Aesthetics and subjectivity

pervaded the everyday geopolitics of Non-Alignment. Everyday Non-Alignment and race in socialist Yugoslavia Non-Alignment built identification with global anti-colonial struggle into the narrative of Yugoslavia's state identity – and, implicitly, into Yugoslav Communism's spatial–historical narratives about the South Slav nations (as struggling against their own imperialist rulers, including the interwar Yugoslav monarchy, before pooling their self-determination into socialist Yugoslavia). In February 1961

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)

there will eventually be a scientific explanation of the most fundamental and puzzling aspects of human existence can still be met with the following rejoinder. Even if cognitive science, for example, were to come up with a widely accepted exhaustive law-based explanation of the nature of self-consciousness, this would, as Dieter Henrich has argued, still leave open unavoidable questions about how to integrate this explanation into the forms of our self-understanding which cannot be reduced to this kind of explanation. Such forms are, of course, encountered not least

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Kant

1 Modern philosophy and the emergence of aesthetic theory: Kant Self-consciousness, knowledge and freedom The importance attributed to aesthetic questions in recent philosophy becomes easier to grasp if one considers the reasons for the emergence of modern aesthetic theory. Kant’s main work on aesthetics, the ‘third Critique’, the Critique of Judgement (CJ) (1790), forms part of his response to unresolved questions which emerge from his Critique of Pure Reason (CPR) (1781) and Critique of Practical Reason (1787).1 In order to understand the significance of the CJ

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Art and interpretation

move is to argue, while providing 185 Art and interpretation an account of self-consciousness which is still significant for the philosophy of mind, that these conditions depend on language, and that languages change with history. There is therefore no timeless structure to the way knowledge is organised. Schleiermacher, then, does not assume that language mirrors some kind of given. He consequently opens up, in a more developed way than anyone in the first half of the nineteenth century, some of the most important space in which contemporary philosophy is played

in Aesthetics and subjectivity