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Reordering privilege and prejudice

anxieties construct a threatening ‘other’ that compounds and reinforces anti-Muslim and anti-Islam sentiments in wider society. It was argued, however, that the empowered subject of ‘othering’ assumed in existing models of Islamophobia needs rethinking in the light of how anti-Islamic and anti-Muslim sentiments emerge in individuals’ narratives as a feeling of themselves being the object of ‘othering’. In this sense anti-Islam or anti-Muslim sentiment is as much a narrative of ‘self’ as ‘other’. In this chapter, attention turns to the exploration of the most consistent

in Loud and proud
Open Access (free)
Passion and politics

emotionally charged narrative of ‘self’ identified among respondents in this study is that of ‘second-class citizen’. This narrative is rooted in a sense of profound injustice based on the perception, almost universally expressed among respondents, that the needs of others are privileged over their own. While the perceived beneficiaries of that injustice might be racialised (as ‘immigrants’, ‘Muslims’ or ethnic minorities), and it is claimed that they are afforded preferential treatment in terms of access to benefits, housing and jobs, the agent responsible for this

in Loud and proud

narrative, self-representation, the construction of “youth” and biography that I repeatedly revisit in this chapter. Returning to social movement studies, an ambiguity exists around the predominant participation of youth in “new social movements”. Melucci, in particular, attempts to consider the appeal and the function of social movement subcultures for young people and further interrogates the meaning of youth as a biological category in “post-industrial societies” (Melucci 1989 , 1996 ). However, due to the lack

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Emotions and research

what is said as a source of access to a true self (Atkinson, 1997 ). This might include providing contextual description before using interview extracts to give a sense of where an extract is situated within a wider interaction, social context or biography and why there might be layers of meaning underneath what is superficially meant. It can also include the iterative analysis of interview extracts with fieldwork notes, identifying areas of tension and

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
The economy of unromantic solidarity

inverse of the autonomous ideal? Morris, a culturally marginal person, illustrates this form of personhood, complicating the myopic narrative of the autonomous self in the squatters movement. The first time I saw Morris was in a documentary; one of hundreds that I viewed at the International Institute for Social History. This documentary profiled a squatted social center in the Staatsliedebuurt in the early 1980s and featured interviews with squatters. The background of Amsterdam looked like a post

in The autonomous life?
Anti-Islam and anti-Muslim sentiments

subjects as threatening to the ‘self’. In shifting the gaze to this ‘self’, moreover, a mismatch is revealed between the empowered subject of ‘othering’ present in existing models of Islamophobia and the way in which 144 Loud and proud: passion and politics in the EDL anti-Islamic sentiments emerge in individual respondents’ narratives in a more complex process of ‘othering’ and feeling ‘othered’. A new crusade? Given that the ‘other’ for grassroots activists in the EDL is constituted as ‘Islam’ or ‘Muslims’, it might be anticipated that the ‘self’ that feels

in Loud and proud
David Lloyd’s work

premises were also, in some regards, different. When (p. 68) Lloyd refers to ‘post-enlightenment liberals such as John Stuart Mill’ and their continuation of Kant’s racial thinking, he suggests that Kant’s centrality to Victorian England is self-evident.6 But Kant’s pan-European influence in conceptions of ‘race’ is a notion that needs further justification. So does Lloyd’s claim for the primacy of cultural theory itself in eighteenth-century conceptualisations of ‘human identity’. This claim does not acknowledge as significant the theorisations produced by political and

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)

Introduction A detective story works when the conclusion is a surprise. If the butler (or frequently, these days, the home secretary or MI5) did it, that has to be hidden until the end, however many clues were scattered on the way. Non-fiction is under the opposite obligation. Readers want to know where the narrative is going. If capitalism is to blame, or is the solution to everything, that must be announced from the start. In practice the genres can be muddled. Accounts of human life can be presented as if they were a surprise which the

in Cultivating political and public identity

themselves. Either way, the process of imperialism is viewed as the precondition of a sense of (European or theoretical) narrative Self, and is predicated on a distorting utilisation of the Other. Imperialism then is not only the explicit practice of power. It is also the disavowal of the possession of power through the belief in one’s ability to know and represent the Other; to pursue such a narrative representation is necessarily to turn the Other into a version of oneself. This formulation does not admit of any notion of possible or progressive mediation. The phenomenon

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
The discovery, commemoration and reinterment of eleven Alsatian victims of Nazi terror, 1947– 52

   Human remains in society were young Alsace-​Lorrainers who had died as forced recruits in the Wehrmacht and SS.4 Alsace was a key geographic centrepiece in the Franco-​German rivalry that spanned the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. In 1871, 1914 and 1940–​44 France and Germany turned the province into a battlefield in a literal military sense during times of war and an ideological battleground of competing national narratives during times of peace. The results of the three different conflicts saw Alsace change sovereignty four times between

in Human remains in society