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Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood

research into the memory narratives of a particular local city press, the study argues that personal memory of cinema is socially constructed by its context to create certain culturally sanctioned discourses, in this case figured around age, community, and city identity. If the last two chapters raised issues of history and memory through particular historical and commemorative texts and events in the 1920s

in Memory and popular film
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Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory

calls a ‘media hall of mirrors’ – a film style dependent on the dizzying mix and self-devouring quotation of historical, mythic and media references – Pleasantville left itself open to criticism of narrative confusion and, more seriously, of demonstrating a lack of political and/or historicist depth. 8 While not argued from the same neo-Marxian position as Jameson, comments

in Memory and popular film
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Jameson’s criticism is something like that of a guest star. Pre-existing narratives, of institutional self-preservation or the long-running critique of the illusory ego, incorporate video into their workings while denying the possibility of other sorts of engagement. In Egoyan’s work, we find a more particularised account of how video changes, but does not destroy, memory, and thus how it changes, without

in Memory and popular film
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The Admirable Crichton and Look Back in Anger

point towards its ambitions, especially in the narrative (where ‘cinematic’ sometimes refers to disruptions to the causal chain of conventional naturalist plotting, or a more overt use of montage) or use of space (where it may denote a more fluid use of multiple fictional locations). ‘Cinematic’ may also refer to overt theatrical references to film genres (see, for example, the plays of David Hare). 5

in British cinema of the 1950s
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traversed the space between wunderkind, bête noire and anti-​ establishment firebrand within little more than a decade, and the story was only just heating up. In Natural Born Killers, Stone pushed the boundaries of mainstream acceptability towards on-​screen violence while articulating a caustic critique of the entertainment–​media complex. The dispute over the rating for the film highlighted a complex web of incompatible needs that touched on the limits of artistic freedom, the preservation of self-​interested studio business, and the effectiveness and extent of

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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less staging posts for institutional and historical assessment, than driving forces for more self-​conscious storytelling. Melodramatic devices in turn contributed to a shift in the way that female roles contributed to the narratives, resulting in a much richer examination of gender than in the early films. In Any Given Sunday (1999), Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) assumes a strong role that is not in any way propped up Lo v e by her sexuality. She is playfully undaunted by the sight of naked football players in the changing rooms, while asserting her own

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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publically quoted investment banks that had become overly dependent on their own trading operations as a source of capital. Zabel laments the changes, and is positioned in the narrative as a moral reference Mo ney point for Moore and the audience. Acquisition appears to be a key driver for James, Gekko and even Moore: they are all acquiring their material share of the American Dream. Tellingly, Moore’s decision to go after James is all about retribution rather than justice. Moore embodies a version of the American Dream, but one which exhibits a self-​serving morality

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Civil rites of passage

narrative. She is self-possessed throughout; progressively more tired but never defeated. She is a paradigm of the ennobled, resolute black citizen who has the decorum and poise that Jo Ann Robinson attributed to Rosa Parks, as signalled in the title of Parks’ memoir, Quiet Strength (1994). In the opening sequence she stands on the bus on her way to work. Her face composed. She is alone. The final freeze

in Memory and popular film
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New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema

investment in the past (and in vinyl). His subsequent purchase of a Delfonics tape endows the song with a specific narrative function, conveying a sense of emotional connectedness between characters never made explicit in their conversation. The music is used internally and self-consciously – the characters comment upon the music, and it is passed between them symbolically. One reviewer of the film – Erik

in Memory and popular film
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The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture

those disseminated through community life – increasingly inadequate. At the same moment, the cinema and the technologised mass culture that it helped inaugurate transformed memory by making possible an unprecedented circulation of images and narratives about the past. Thanks to these new technologies of memory on the one hand and commodification on the other, the kinds of memories that one has ‘intimate

in Memory and popular film