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Data becoming risk information

( 2012 ) describes information as a point of coherence and beauty amidst the chaotic, self-fulfilling operations of the digital world. If we were to apply this to the spectrum Dodge and Kitchin have developed, information combines scattered data to create meaning. As John Law (2002) and James Ash ( 2014 ) have noted, data are characterised by homeomorphism wherein they change form and meaning as they are processed

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Virtuousness, virtuality and virtuosity in NATO’s representation of the Kosovo campaign

’. The rest of the pre-air-strike narrative provides a tale of institutional networking, with hypertext links to UN Security Council Resolutions 1199 and 1203, to the Contact Group, as well as to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). NATO supported the OSCE by providing a military task force for use in a possible emergency evacuation of members of the Kosovo Verification

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

we traditionally have come to understand as ‘war’. The distinctions and borderlines that have over time helped to carve out the concept of war (setting it apart from non-war) now seem to be faltering. A previously well-delineated and uncon-tested concept, ‘war’ no longer seems to be its good old self, the critics claim. ‘Kosovo’ therefore not only sets in motion a conceptual transition by breaking

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Kosovo and the Balkanisation–integration nexus

Introduction: writing security Security is among the most debated and contested concepts in the study of international relations (IR). ‘Security’ commands a unique metaphysical and disciplinary power which involves the drawing of imaginary lines, the consolidated resentment of difference ( vis-à-vis the ‘other’), as well as the constitution of self

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

systematic distortion and misrepresentation. Commercial media seem to operate outside the scientific principles of source criticism and public verifiability, and the democratic principles of accountability. The result tends to be a set of very specific social practices resembling Baudrillard’s infamous self-referential system of simulation, in which all sense of truth and origin is lost in the play of

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Lessons for critical security studies?

significance is not easy. As Thomas Faist ( 2013 ) notes, it is problematic to assume that enhanced mobility is self-evidently positive or equally shared. Indeed, the current global refugee crisis is a tragic reminder of how mobility and immobility are certainly at the core of international politics, in both positive and negative ways. As the ‘flow’ of refugees grows, one can witness the increasing

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
A European fin de siècle

of Kosovar guerrillas – and it accelerated the emptying of the population at large. In humanitarian terms, the Kosovo campaign turned into a disaster. 2 Indeed, it turned out to be a vicious circle and a self-propelled enterprise: NATO bombs accelerated ethnic cleansing, and the stronger outflow of refugees (escaping not

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

, dying’, ‘three hundred years behind the rest of the world’. 23 Moreover, in the racist narrative dominant in the country, the ‘Anglo-Saxon race’, the Americans in particular, were regarded the ‘superior race’, with the Africans and American Indians at the lowest scale, and Latin people, such as the Spaniards, somewhere between the two extremes. At various times during 1895–98 the Cuban insurgents were disparaged on the basis that the majority of fighters were Afro-Cubans and

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Civilisation, civil society and the Kosovo war

, he argues that government does not only concern politics, but also the government of the self: the way a nation is governed and the way individuals govern their own behaviour are parts of the same construction. This observation springs from a study Foucault conducted on the historical sociology of the state in which he points out that the development of the modern sovereign state has gone hand in

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Israeli security experience as an international brand

Schneiker 2014 : 247). These images and stories, in this case, consist of combat and security experience of security personnel connected to the PSCs. These are the narratives that give experience, products, and agents (security capital) their special value (symbolic capital) and finally their economic capital. Israel as a nation of security experts Israel’s state and society

in Security/ Mobility