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Looking beyond the state

colonial states and colonised societies. Yet, despite much self-congratulation at achieving a comparatively nuanced understanding of these relationships, glaring gaps remain and there is work still to be done. Although certain colonial institutions and policies have been revisited and reassessed by historians in recent times, others still await the benefits of renewed academic consideration. It is the central

in Beyond the state
Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika

in the Introduction, such collaboration between colonial state and non-state partners usually reflected colonial self-interest, and the model that had emerged by the mid-1940s certainly did that. But it also reflected internal dialogues within and between mission medical providers as to their wider social role. In other words, the public-private (voluntary) partnership that was established reflected

in Beyond the state
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lee-line between the nature of self, at one end, and the nature of the collective, at the other, in which subjectivity, race and colonisation were reimagined as the conditions for culture, nation and freedom. In France Présence africaine ( Revue Culturelle du Monde Noir) , founded in 1947, was dedicated to revitalising, illustrating and creating ‘values that belong to the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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constituencies faced eternal damnation. Here, to my mind, were discourses that drew upon imperial concerns to construct narratives of progress. This seemed a more productive way of proceeding, and so I studied evangelical and travel writings on the metropolitan poor and India in order to understand better the ways in which they were structured by, and the mechanisms they displayed to express fears about, the

in The other empire

-century literature. It was not just that personalized accounts of (self) discovery provided the narrative structure of the first novels, but also that the combination of extreme scepticism and naïve empiricism constituted the self-conscious critical theory necessary for their emergence as a genre. 15 With Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels the boundaries between travelogue and fiction

in The other empire
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The predicament of history

decolonisation; and the historical imagination itself. On race and ethnicity I’ll say only a little. There is no doubt that of those non-white West Indians we discuss, born before the cataclysm of the 1930s, the majority strove hard in their personal lives to rise above race. In this, the political ultras, James and Padmore, were little different from self-styled moderates, such as Moody. (McKay, as so often

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Vidiadhur Surajprasad Naipaul’s narratives of arrival in England return repeatedly to his father Seepersad’s nurturing of his artistic ambition in Trinidad, and his early prescience that the ‘idea of the writing vocation’ given him by a colonial acculturation could be realised and practised in England. 1 In making himself a writer, 2 he has abjured being categorised as

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand

necessary practice in Russia or Germany but not among ‘free and loyal’ ‘Anglo-Saxon peoples’. 153 The narrative of democracy and egalitarianism both produced and challenged the mythology of New Zealand as a nation. The Observer of Auckland challenged the boundaries of acceptable discourse when it encouraged the citizen-subjects of the city to demonstrate restraint and self

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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, diverse and self-conscious attempts to grasp the complex totality of London, the literature can be seen as an early popular modernism that laid the foundation for the writings of Dickens, Mayhew and their successors, and for popular Victorian theatre and graphic illustration. This recognition of the important – but ultimately limited – practice of observation adopted by Egan and his

in The other empire
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empires – THE DESIRE IMPLANTED IN THE HUMAN BREAST OF BETTERING ITS CONDITION’ was raised as the guiding principle to action. 19 Moral regeneration of the poor through self-help, industry, frugality, purity and the suppression of vice was the ideal to be pursued. All this was predicated on an unabashed empiricism. Information on the education, health and general condition of the poor

in The other empire