Search results

Open Access (free)
James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport

appointment’. 5 A similar relationship is set up in John Madden’s 1997 film about Queen Victoria, Mrs. Brown , with the bearded Glaswegian comic Billy Connolly playing the role of Her Majesty’s loyal Scottish servant, Mr Brown. A controversial blow against Scottish nationalism perhaps, the peripheral subject of Her Majesty is represented as a life-giving force for an institution in crisis. In Mrs. Brown

in The British monarchy on screen
Screening Victoria

. 2 See Jeff Smith, The Presidents We Imagine (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2009 ). 3 See, for example, Trevor Parry-Giles and Shawn J. Parry-Giles, The Prime-Time Presidency. The West Wing and U.S. Nationalism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2006

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama

Tara Judah, ‘ The King’s Speech ’, Liminal Vision (25 December 2010 ), http://liminalvision.wordpress.com/2010/12/25/the-kings-speech/ . 60 Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (London: Verso, rev. edn, 1991

in The British monarchy on screen
Writing on the body

2007). She sees tango as opening up the way for engaging a cultural phenomenon which is both nationalistic and inventive. She finds that dance allows the creation of two worlds in parallel. At the same time, she writes, ‘the body cannot be reduced to language’ (Manning 2007:  58). Manning understands language here as necessarily reductive and in a tension between invention and political structure (in this quotation, nationalism). Eminent dance theorist Randy Martin has provided a beautifully articulated definition of dance: dance is best understood as a kind of

in Dance and politics

, and his mouth movements morphed so that they seem to form the word ‘imagine’. In this context, Lennon’s morphed response seems to imply that Gump’s descriptions of the alien mode of life in China became the genesis of the famous song. Thus, a song that protests against the power of materialism, nationalism, and religion is transformed in Forrest Gump into a celebration of American values: the

in Memory and popular film
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee

‘employed narratives of local community development alongside the religious rhetoric of nationalism to forge a united community of believers out of residents with diverse ethnic, class, and regional backgrounds’. 45 However, by the turn of the century, industrial and professional elites emerged as the boosters of such events. Accordingly, these festivals often charted the ‘progress’ of American capitalist

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)

globalisation with an understanding of the seductions of both the technological and its apparent opposite, the autochthonous, Egoyan invites us to direct a critical forgetting in two directions at once. Technologised memory and nationalisms are both instrumental in a strong sense and produce, in his films and the world itself, the irrationalities of any totalising system. In order for memory to have meaning in

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I

that monarchs are everyday folk with quotidian concerns. The diary entries also add to this mixture insight into the opinions of different classes regarding the monarchy, and a recognition of the way in which the status of royalty is bound up with nationalism, a nation’s understanding of its own power, position and status. Orlando – Woolf’s queer, genre-defying fantasia – was

in The British monarchy on screen
Outdoor screens and public congregations

survival of which is dependent on ‘accommodating political, economic, social, and technological change’. 17 As a brand, the British royal family, Otnes and Maclaran suggest, offers ‘tangible benefits. These include providing consumers with a respected and shared symbol of nationalism, helping them engage in national “togetherness” and fostering a sense of identity based on shared history, culture and traditions.’ 18 We

in The British monarchy on screen