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Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45

This chapter examines the changes in Anglo-Canadian identity through the 1930s, and also documents the effects of the Second World War in re-defining and shifting this identity towards centering Canada. During the Second World War, when Canada came to Britain's aid, stringent organisation led to a massive contribution to the war effort by large numbers of IODE women. The IODE used its maternal position to reinforce allegiance to Britain, but its perception was ever more Canada-centered. With women's increasing status in society, the IODE's war work was ever confident and impressive. The Second World War accentuated the contradictions between feminism and patriotism. During the war, women had shown that, in the absence of many of Canada's men, they were capable of keeping the country going, whether in the home or in gendered male occupations. The IODE's metaphorical conception of home as nation and Empire became, during the Second World War, more assertive, more confident, more proven and more Canadian in its focus.

in Female imperialism and national identity
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

57 Keith Kyle, ‘Gandhi, Harry Thuku and Early Kenya Nationalism’, Transition , 27, 1966 , pp. 16–22, at p. 17; Robert J. Blyth, The Empire of the Raj: India, Eastern Africa and the Middle East, 1858–1947 , Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003 , pp. 104–19 58

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)

-invent itself, building on ideas largely moulded at the beginning of the twentieth century. It might be assumed that as the British Empire declined, so too would the IODE. Here, the IODE’s positioning as a national, as well as an imperial, organization is an important factor, one on which this book has focused. The IODE was able to latch on to a growing Canadian nationalism, at the same time as it reluctantly shed

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom

possibilities facing other black women of her time, but her particular focus on issues of gender and women’s liberation, alongside those of racial equality and cultural nationalism, meant that she was challenging structures of inequality that were commonly regarded as less urgent and less central in the intellectual and political agendas of her time. This chapter will offer a reading of Marson

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

insight into the modernization of imperialism and nationalism themselves. And upper-class Anglo-Celtic femininity was an important part of such modernization. In Forever England Alison Light shows, through literary sources, how English culture and patriotism became bound up with domesticity and ‘the private’ at this time. 30 The tour was another representation of such modernity

in Female imperialism and national identity

and failing to see exactly what the Nizam of Hyderabad did, had no chance of observing the others do homage. 6 The Gaekwad of Baroda was Sayaji Rao III, the young prince whom the Prince of Wales had met in 1875. He had recently converted to a liberal nationalism, making contributions to the Indian National Congress and Dadabhai Naoroji’s British

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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meaning of the mountie to represent changing Anglo-Canadian nationalism. 13 Also concerned with icons, Daniel Francis takes a critical look at national identity through an examination of ‘myths’ in Canadian history such as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), and the myth of unity with Quebec. 14 The shaping of Canadian culture, history, politics and health

in Female imperialism and national identity
Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship

of how they imagined themselves as people. South Asian scholars and Indian nationalists have long identified the municipal politics of Bombay and Calcutta as the hotbeds of proto-nationalism, where future nationalists learned and practised politics. Hugh Tinker argued in his Foundations of Local Self-Government : When the Indian

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)

domestic organisation and village life, in Tuk Bands 7 and Landship, 8 in Banja songs and banter, 9 in the grammar and lexicography of creole, in faith practices and workplace negotiations, in the entire cultural topography of black Caribbean life misunderstood, denigrated and vilified by the colonial authority. The importance of the riots as a catalyst for cultural renovation and nationalism is

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain