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Open Access (free)
Behind the screen

display’. 1 The observation that playwrights are drawn to processes of ‘making’ partly because of the instability of notions of ending, ‘completeness’ and even erasure has raised questions about the terms of critical access to the decentred ‘patchiness’ of early modern culture. Throughout this study, I have alluded to early modern cultural investment in incompletion as having implications for our

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale

understanding of the supposed statue of which Paulina is patron. Certainly, the open-endedness of the ‘statue scene’ has proved irresistible for critics of The Winter’s Tale , and is often positioned as the summit of Shakespeare’s thought on aesthetic and sensory experience. 6 Given the prominence of this highly ambiguous depiction of patronage of the visual arts in

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion

envisaged as matter ‘under construction’ at the hands of spectators. To dislodge early modern concepts of finish and completion is to suggest that the constant reproduction of incompletion may be a condition of cultural production in this period. This much is often suggested in early modern studies. Writing on The Winter’s Tale , for example, Knapp concludes that ‘the openness attributed to the

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama

: spectators as ‘makers’ The prologues and epilogues performed on the commercial stages of early modern London frequently draw attention to the significance of spectators as participants in the construction of meaning. For example, The Travels of the Three English Brothers , by John Day, William Rowley and George Wilkins, first performed and published in 1607, opens with a

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?

understand concepts of cultural production and reception as these register in early modern English drama. 6 In this respect my argument is highly unusual, since most studies in this area start from the point of the supposed absence of visual culture in an iconoclastic post-Reformation England blighted by lack of knowledge about the Italian visual arts. 7 Frederick Kiefer opens his study of the emblematic

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama