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Coding same-sex union in Amis and Amiloun

a personage than the young king Edward II was partner in a same-sex union. This well-documented relationship was not only known throughout the country but became a major political issue of the day.29 We do well to recall that the compendious Auchinleck manuscript contains – besides its romances and religious texts – a metrical chronicle of England, a list of Norman barons who supposedly fought at Hastings, a verse life of Richard I, and a stanzaic poem on the various ills England experienced during the reign of Edward II. If we read a political subtext in Amis and

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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audience are freed from the exigencies of daily life not just so that they can escape the world they know (magic operates only in a minority of the Middle English popular romances and likewise forests are not obligatory), but so that they can explore – to test, to defy, to confirm – the principles by which it operates. Although invariably located in an elite aristocratic milieu (from whence neither author not audience is likely to issue), these narratives treat of subjects like courtship and marriage, domestic violence, political and social authority, ethical conduct

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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What lovers want

decorated with the story of Ydoine and Amadace, ‘πe kyngus owun banere’ on the tester is a potent reminder of what she represents (1501–2). In real life even the pope had birds and flowers in his bedchamber at Avignon, not saints or theologians or political symbols. There is a long tradition of detailed description of building decoration in medieval literature and various models have been suggested for this remarkable scheme. Davenport looks at both the well-known wall paintings at Longthorpe Tower, French and English romances, and allegorical court poetry, without

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars

the lump in order to show how its treatment throws into relief the different configurations of paternity and maternity, of gender roles and of religious politics put forward in a range of re-tellings. Three kinds of critical analysis are put forward, progressively narrowing the focus of study. Building on Lillian Herlands Hornstein’s impressive scholarship, I begin by studying analogues of KT drawn from medieval chronicles; these analogues allow an appreciation of features shared by the different narratives. The second section turns to the Auchinleck text of KT

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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Greeks and Saracens inGuy of Warwick

10 Romancing the East: Greeks and Saracens in Guy of Warwick Rebecca Wilcox Guy’s ties to the East For decades, literary critics such as Frederic Jameson and Stephen Knight have argued that medieval romance, for the most part, unquestioningly reflects dominant ideologies of the ruling elite.1 Far from conforming to this prescription, however, the fourteenth-century popular romance Guy of Warwick engages contemporary socio-political concerns in critical and transformative ways. Guy’s fantastic reworking of England’s past through its titular hero both recognises

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral

(Turnhout: Brepols, 2011). 68 Beebe, ‘Reading mental pilgrimage in context’, 58. 69 George Cavendish, The life and death of Cardinal Wolsey, ed. R. S. Sylvester, EETS 243 (London: Oxford University Press, 1959), 32. 70 Quoted in Richard W. Hoyle, ‘Percy, Henry Algernon, sixth earl of Northumberland (c.1502–1537)’. Oxford dictionary of national biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004); online edn, Jan 2008. 71 Richard W. Hoyle, The Pilgrimage of Grace and the politics of the 1530s (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), at 284. 72 Cf. Hoyle, ‘Percy, Henry

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

the one hand, eating the Turk’s Head mirrors crusader fantasy: Christians consume Saracens in their conquest, real or desired, of the Holy Land. On the other hand, by literalising the rhetoric of conquest, it makes the unimaginable transgression (eating Saracens) completely imaginable. Like sex and commerce, medieval politics, in particular the politics of national expansion, is fraught with the anthropophagic urge: lords ‘etheπ’ their underlings and ‘deuouren’ the poor; knights ‘swolwe’ one another and so too do kingdoms; enemies are ‘glotons’; and victors ‘feste

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’

necessitate reader participation. A poem concerned with man’s awareness of God’s mercy, ‘Abbey Walk’ introduces a simple refrain at the end of each of its stanzas: ‘Obey and thank thi God off all’. The poem gains its modern title from its first few lines, in which Henryson describes an occasion when, solitary and struggling to address life’s adversities, the narrator of the poem goes out walking and unexpectedly sees a hymn written upon a wall. This positioning suggests an external origin for the hymn: rather than simply a composition of Henryson’s, it can be viewed as a

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

scenes inside the city walls where hundreds die daily for lack of food and water, culminating in the surrender of the Jews and their sale into slavery by the Romans. Jerusalem is informed throughout by a variety of sensibilities: religious, political, economic, and social. The Roman crusade against the Jews and Jerusalem is framed by Christian justifications; issues of empire and rule are played out within the Roman camp and between the Romans and the Jews; because the Jews have refused to pay tribute to Rome, the economics of revenge initiate, in part, the original

in Pulp fictions of medieval England

offered. Gowther is the name of the son born to a hitherto childless duchess after she is first threatened with repudiation by her husband and then apparently impregnated by a devil out in an orchard. This son grows up pursuing a life of reckless helter-skelter sadism. However, when an elderly earl of the region alleges that such tyranny proves he cannot be of human stock, Gowther coerces his mother to admit the devilish identity of his father. He recoils from this revelation into a course of abject penitence. Under the pope’s instruction he embraces complete voluntary

in Pulp fictions of medieval England