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1 Popular music and the ‘cultural archive’ This book began its Introduction, and begins its chapter structure, not in the mainstream of international affairs (the politics of state socialist Non-Alignment, or postsocialist European border control) but with what might seem a more distant topic: popular music. It does so because the everyday structures of feeling perceptible through popular music are a readily observable sign that ideas of race are part of identity-making in the Yugoslav region; proving this point opens the way to revisiting

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship

1. Introduction Who has a claim to be included in a democratic polity? This has been a vexing question for political theorists as well as legislators and judges. Philosophers have tried to make the problem go away by adopting one of two contrasting strategies. The first response is that democratic principles cannot resolve the problem and therefore we have to accept the historical contingency of

in Democratic inclusion

down the wrath of the proto-positivist thinkers of his day. Yet, while Rousseau was a ‘gospel Christian’ (at least by his own definition), he was also preoccupied with the moral and political implications of secularism. Especially the development (or demise) of ethical theory after Hobbes. It is not least because of this that he is of interest to the modern science of politics. Rousseau rejected the Hobbesian view. In opposition to his colleagues he maintained that the ‘summation of all morality is given by the Gospel in its summation of the Law’ (III: 155–6). The

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Rousseau as a constitutionalist

67 11/09/03, 13:34 68 The political philosophy of Rousseau Rousseau did not believe that these mechanisms would rid society of its ills once and for all. He was not a utopian. Politics would not become automatic; the good society required good citizens. ‘The greatest public authority’, he wrote, ‘lies in the hearts of its citizens … nothing can take the place of morality in government. It is not only upright men who know how to administer the laws but at bottom only good men who know how to obey them’ (III: 252, italics added). In short, man should learn to

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)

: Palgrave Macmillan . Brubaker , Rogers W. 2005 . “ The Diaspora Diaspora .” Ethnic and Racial Studies 28 ( 1 ): 1–19 . Carens , Joseph H. 1989 . “ Membership and Morality: Admission to Citizenship in Liberal Democratic States .” In Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in Europe and North America , edited by Rogers W. Brubaker . Lanham and London : University Press of

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Time and space

. Such readings could problematize the very nature of the historical archive as well as initiate conversations with other orientations, including those of structural linguistics and critical theory. 1 No less salient were incipient acknowledgments of the innately political character of history writing. In this wider scenario, attending the history (honors) undergraduate program

in Subjects of modernity

, genocide. 1 Transnational feminist histories of race and empire meanwhile reveal the everyday, intimate politics of global racial formations, where racialised ideologies of gender, sexuality and bodies circulated between colonised territories and metropoles, indeed into any society that even aspired to the modernity of European civilisational superiority (McClintock 1995 ; Young 1995 ; Stoler 2002 ). ‘Race’ simultaneously structures new experiences of migration, informing states' classifications of who may cross borders or settle more freely or less so, and shaping

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Kant

able to attempt to see why that knowledge is warrantable, without invoking theology or unquestioningly accepting that science represents a pre-existing reality. There can be no doubt about the truth of the propositions of mathematics and their capacity to generate potentially valid scientific knowledge. Neither does Kant doubt the existence of binding moral imperatives. What he wishes to establish is what in us makes them possible. It should already be clear, however, that the explanation of what makes cognition and morality possible will have to be achieved in Kant

in Aesthetics and subjectivity

ministering to the enslaved population on plantations, and they exercised strict control over their flock. They opposed dancing and drumming and operated a strictly conservative morality with regard to sexual relations (Boa, 1998 ). The Wilderness People found the services of the Methodists staid and unacceptable as a form of worship. 3 Methodist missionary ministers, meanwhile, were

in Frontiers of the Caribbean

existence tolerable. Schopenhauer attempts to demonstrate the metaphysical truth of art in his account of music, giving music the kind of privileged philosophical role it had at times for the early Romantics. As we saw in Hegel, the idea of the truth of art is threatened in modernity by new kinds of legitimation in the scientific, legal and political spheres, which rely on excluding particularity from the realm of the highest truth. Schopenhauer, though, sees the highest truth as still located in art, not in science, law or philosophy. Despite his Platonic (and Buddhist

in Aesthetics and subjectivity