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The case for practice theory

7 Digital maps and anchored time: the case for practice theory Matthew Hanchard Introduction Digital maps are increasingly embedded within everyday practices, from choosing a holiday destination to gaining directions to a bar. As hypermediate and remediate forms (Bolter and Grusin, 2000), they are situated within a complex array of connected technologies: web mapping services output digital cartography via popular web map engines like Google and Bing Maps which, in turn, sit embedded on websites. Meanwhile, location-based services allow users to check in almost

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

representations that Mapping the space of flows 183 are mutable and flowing and no longer fixed in time and space as ink on paper is. Writing has become liquid, and digital representations of meaning have begun to pulse and flow at an ever-quickening pace that militates against the pause and traction, ­concentration and reflection that meaning construction and knowledge production demand, and that print culture could facilitate. One is surely justified in wondering whether this emphasis upon the mapping of flows, rather than, or in addition to, routes and static locations

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

6 Introduction T he mood is shifting in the contemporary globalisation debate. Only a few years ago, talk of the contested and politicised nature of globalisation would have met with scepticism from those who emphasise the sheer economic power of globalising forces. The orthodox popular and academic representations of globalisation have for several decades sustained the image of a powerful economic and technological bulldozer that effortlessly shovels up states and societies. The very discourse of the ‘competition state’ (Cerny, 1990) effectively sanitised

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

identities (Baym, 1999; Jenkins, 2006); or as a virtual realm separate from, and/or in flux with, ‘common’ human biologies (Hayles, 2002). Already a decade ago, communication researcher Mark Nunes, picking up on the unique language of digital engagement used by academics and popular media alike, critically noted that: while the rhetoric may have cooled, reference to the Internet in spatial terms – as cyberspace or some other place – still occurs frequently on television and in print. This sense of space is also still mapped by the verbs of displacement – ­browsing

in Time for mapping
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

20 December 2017).  6 For more fine-grained typologies of data, see Kitchin (2014).  7 The urban dashboard is frequently described in terms of being the city’s brain or operating system, in a striking parallel to popular research that sees the human brain as a supercomputer driving behaviour, experience and thought. This stands in stark c­ ontrast 252 (In)formalising  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 to research that focuses on affect as a relational and distributed kind of ‘smartness’ (Zeidner, Matthews and Roberts, 2009; Arvidsson and Colleoni, 2012; Buser

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency

6 Globalisation at work: unheard voices and invisible agency T he contemporary problematic of globalisation has encouraged a particular mode of knowledge to dominate explanations of social change. Academic and popular discussion of all matters ‘global’ have predominantly asked ‘what is happening’ type questions. It has become almost common sense to seek to explain the nature of the beast itself, making reference to technological and market structures as the driving forces of change. In this formulation the everyday lives of people are positioned passively

in Globalisation contested