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popular press, was, by 1929, already legitimate and established as ‘mainstream medicine’ – hence the ‘scandal’. 56 On the one hand, Finsen’s Nobel Prize (1903), Gauvain’s knighthood (1920), and ongoing royal sanctioning indicates that it was a legitimate medical therapy by this time. On the other hand, light therapy’s zealous use and popularity caused the MRC considerable distress from the early 1920s onwards, as Edwards himself showed, because

in Soaking up the rays
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therapy took place in hospitals, sanatoria, spas, and in private and public clinics, at schools and factories, on the beach, and in the home. 3 It could be expensive (home-use lamps were pricey) or free when physicians or medical officers of health sent poor children and adults to council-run or charitable clinics. By 1928, when The Times distributed ‘Sunlight and Health’, light therapy had reached its zenith in popularity

in Soaking up the rays
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lights clearly found a new market in the 1890s in the wake of Edison’s incandescent bulbs’ tremendous popularity and commercial exploitation. See also Bazerman, Edison’s Light , p. 337. 65 ‘Light Treatment in Hospitals’, The Times , ‘Sunlight and Health’ special supplement, 22 May 1928, pp. xxxi–xxxii, at p. xxxii. This is also cited in Jamieson, ‘An Intolerable

in Soaking up the rays