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Open Access (free)
Yulia Karpova

great popularity and high attendance at the exhibition implied an affirmative answer – or, at least, the willingness of Russians to dwell on it now. Western design historians and curators, too, increasingly contribute to this positive narrative of the history of Soviet design, but from a more critical, distanced position. They appreciate precisely what people such as Kos’kov consider to be errors: interdisciplinary approaches, drawing on the findings of philosophy and sociology, and an orientation towards the harmonisation of the environment rather than sheer profit

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

popular press, was, by 1929, already legitimate and established as ‘mainstream medicine’ – hence the ‘scandal’. 56 On the one hand, Finsen’s Nobel Prize (1903), Gauvain’s knighthood (1920), and ongoing royal sanctioning indicates that it was a legitimate medical therapy by this time. On the other hand, light therapy’s zealous use and popularity caused the MRC considerable distress from the early 1920s onwards, as Edwards himself showed, because

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

’ experimentation with textures in the 1960s; hence the popularity of pulegoso in the Soviet Union. 3 Jacques Rancière, ‘Foreword’, in The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible (London: Continuum, 2006), p. 10. 4 Jacques Rancière, ‘Artistic Regimes and the Shortcomings of the Notion of Modernity’, in The Politics of Aesthetics, p. 21. 5 Boris Groys, The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992). 6 Matthew Cullerne Bown, Socialist Realist Painting (New Haven, CT: Yale

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

therapy took place in hospitals, sanatoria, spas, and in private and public clinics, at schools and factories, on the beach, and in the home. 3 It could be expensive (home-use lamps were pricey) or free when physicians or medical officers of health sent poor children and adults to council-run or charitable clinics. By 1928, when The Times distributed ‘Sunlight and Health’, light therapy had reached its zenith in popularity

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

attack. On the contrary, these consumer choices found understanding as a legitimate reaction to ‘the striving of a small group of design specialists to offer people, in a centralised manner, a ready and complete model of material environment’.85 Pereverzev’s text exemplifies an internal critique of VNIITE design policy and attitudes that unfolded simultaneously with the development of neodecorativism in decorative art. Both processes captured and responded to the growing popularity of antiques and rising anti-urban moods among Soviet intellectuals that were reflected

in Comradely objects
Yulia Karpova

by 1970. While commitment to citizens’ prosperity was Brezhnev’s strategy to oppose the voluntarism of his predecessor and maintain his own popularity, the quality of consumer goods could not steadily grow because of systemic industrial flaws, such as outdated equipment, poor supply of materials, and the ongoing prevalence of quantitative plan indicators that precluded qualitative improvement. At the same time, as Natalia Chernyshova demonstrates in her study of Brezhnev-era consumption, by the 1970s Soviet people had grown more familiar with Western consumer goods

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

lights clearly found a new market in the 1890s in the wake of Edison’s incandescent bulbs’ tremendous popularity and commercial exploitation. See also Bazerman, Edison’s Light , p. 337. 65 ‘Light Treatment in Hospitals’, The Times , ‘Sunlight and Health’ special supplement, 22 May 1928, pp. xxxi–xxxii, at p. xxxii. This is also cited in Jamieson, ‘An Intolerable

in Soaking up the rays