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Precedents to sustainability in nineteenth-century literature and culture

, remained in the cultural background until the late twentieth century, Grober suggests that the practical connotations raised by the Romantic conception of a living, powerful nature were buried under a competing, increasingly dominant free-market liberalism. For example, the briefly Sustenance from the past 37 fashionable doctrine of cameralism had advocated State-administered strategies for achieving sustainable self-sufficiency in the supply of food and raw materials via measures like environmental improvement, reclamation or the indigenous cultivation of

in Literature and sustainability
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Gender and a new politics in Achebe

’s Anthills of the Savannah (1987) remains the culmination point of his achievement as a writer of fiction, as well as being an elaboration of his earlier novelistic interests. The novel is, as Ben Okri has remarked, Achebe’s ‘most complex and his wisest book to date’.2 Dealing in coded terms with Nigeria’s calcified power-elite, and the bankruptcy of its post-independence nepotistic politics, Anthills of the Savannah is in many respects a sequel to the penultimate novel A Man of the People (1966), which explored themes of political corruption and military takeover on the eve

in Stories of women
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modernists regularly broke with their own newly formed doctrinal principles.13 Crucially, in cultural terms, it is the experience ‘of fragmentation, of nearness to an edge, or dissolution of self’ that produces what Helen McNeil calls the ‘characteristic modernist terror’ of T. S. Eliot, as represented primarily in The Waste Land, but elsewhere too.14 Post-war, the pattern can be discerned more clearly still: ‘the modernists who followed after World War I were more noticeable for their pessimism and their sense of a failed, fragmented, society’.15 Peter 2395 intro 7

in Fragmenting modernism
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Culture, criticism, theory since 1990

’.35 Revisionist and anti-revisionist camps alike could argue that history was being manipulated to airbrush conflict from the past for the benefit of the heritage and tourist industries, whether by recycling hoary myths and nationalist verities, or by neutralising the North as a site of political conflict and marginalising those who question the merits of economic liberalism and labour flexibility. Despite the strategic silences and evasions in relation to the past since 1990, however, it is hard to reject Carla Power’s assertion that ‘thanks to the boom, Ireland

in Irish literature since 1990

(eds), Conceiving the New World Order:  The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, pp. 78–​102.  130 130 Vulnerability and visibility Cooper, M. and C. Waldby (2008). ‘The biopolitics of reproduction:  Post-​Fordist biotechnology and women’s clinical labour’, Australian Feminist Studies, 23:55. http://​dx.doi.org/​10.1080/​08164640701816223. Cooper, M. and C. Waldby (2014). Clinical Labor: Tissue Donors and Research Subjects in the Global Bioeconomy. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press. Damelio

in The power of vulnerability
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women’s suffrage and, as Jo Vellacot points out, like many other women campaigners, Marshall’s ideals of suffrage sprang from a background of liberalism; she had absorbed J.S. Mill’s Liberalism, for example, and in her case – as in that of others – suffrage (and, later, her pacifism) could be seen as a ‘component’ of her personal liberal ideals. After the Women’s International Congress of the Hague in April 1915 caused a split to occur in the NUWSS over education for Peace and support for that meeting, Marshall helped to found the British section of the Women

in A war of individuals
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Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s

by the  200 200 Vulnerability and cultural policy Committee’s division for sex and cohabitation issues, and their specific subdivision for contraceptives and birth control (Riksarkivet [hereafter RA], n.d.a; RA, 1977b). Eva and Maria was supported under the banner ‘collaboration with cultural producers’, an allocated budget post that formed part of the division’s information work about contraceptives that had begun in 1973 (RA, n.d.a; Utredningen om homosexuellas situation i samhället, 1984: 209–​ 12). The Woman in Your Life Is You was funded by a budget

in The power of vulnerability
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‘tearing itself apart’ had failed utterly. Shaw’s criticisms and solutions (including a ‘League of Peace’) contained within his personal manifesto had seen him roundly condemned and he had been forced to step down from the two committees of the Society of Authors and resign both his membership of the Dramatists’ Club and his directorship of the New Statesman in 1916. Although he was also struck off a list of proposed names for a post-war Reconstruction Committee by Lloyd George, Shaw continued his chairmanship of the Fabian Research Department throughout the war. In

in A war of individuals
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Towards an archaeology of modernism

of high modernism, post-stutter so to speak. Modernist art is autonomous art, but autonomous art must always be understood as possessing a ‘double character’: ‘something that severs itself from empirical reality and thereby from society’s functional context and yet is at the same time part of empirical reality and society’s functional context’.6 Hence aesthetic phenomena are directly both purely aesthetic, phenomena that have their gravity and meaning as ingredients in an autonomous practice, and social facts, although these two aspects are never experientially

in The new aestheticism
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, ‘the dissent which they articulated shared certain Christian and Socialist presuppositions, but neither Christianity nor Socialism was the substance of their pacifism’.6 From an early age, ‘his desire to serve humanity was strong’, E.M. Forster declared in his 1934 biography of Dickinson, though pointing out, in a statement tinged with Forster’s own post-war regret, that ‘love of humanity’ did not now (in the 1930s) carry with it the same promise that it had done in the previous century. In 1887, three years after obtaining a First in Classics, Dickinson was elected

in A war of individuals