Search results

’ (1997: 7-8). These countries are directly identified as converging around the OECD Jobs Strategy blueprint for labour flexibility. By contrast, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark and Sweden, among others, are criticised for their structural impediments to wage flexibility, their high levels of social transfers, and their use of active labour market policies: ‘It remains an open question whether a policy approach that sees public intervention in post-compulsory education, training and active labour market policies as a substitute for relative wage flexibility is

in Globalisation contested

, the revival of IPE in the 1970s precisely coincided with the inability of conventional IR frameworks to ‘fully comprehend structural change’ (Gill, 1997: 7). IPE, by contrast, claims to offer a distinctive ontology, one that is attuned to social forces and social relations on a global scale, and also a distinctive epistemology that is ‘open’ to diverse insights on social transformation (Strange, 1984; 1994).1 Hence, as Robert Cox has it, IPE embodies inherent critical potential, an ability to ‘stand back’ from the apparent order of things and to consider ‘the ways

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

acceptance of more partial and local ways of approaching research only really advanced with the widespread adoption of social constructivist and post-structural thinkers such as Said, Foucault, Lefebvre and Derrida. The trend continues to be evidenced in the frequent citation of luminaries of postmodern ways of knowing the world, from Soja, to Dear and Gregory, at varying times in different disciplines across the humanities and social sciences (Warf and Arias, 2009). This continuing Figure 1.1  ‘Spatial Turn’ over time (Google Books Ngram Viewer, http

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory

Situationist 156 Stitching memories movements (Rasmussen, 2004); and second, through theoretical critique of the power relations between map content and spatial knowledge(s). On the latter, key moments include Harley and Woodward’s History of Cartography (Andrews, 2001) – a massively ambitious (and on-going) project, intended to redress subaltern dynamics within map representation (Harley, 1987). In drawing on Harley’s combination of post-structuralism, semiotics and social constructionism, the project sought to critique knowledge-politics in map representation (1988a

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

_Global_06_Ch5 127 6/19/02, 2:07 PM Globalisation contested 128 managing director of Land Rover. (Letter, Professional Engineering, 11 March, 1998: 33) In 1998, by this time owned by German BMW, the British-based car company announced it may recruit abroad, following 20 applications for 150 advertised skilled engineering posts. With Honda in Swindon reporting problems with skills shortages, it would seem that the British location is the most significant factor in enabling or constraining restructuring decisions. Now owned by Ford, Land Rover continues to exhibit the

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Britain

the structural dynamics of the wider world economy: The balance of risk in the world economy is shifting – with the slowdown in demand in a number of countries, especially Asia … These are problems that can only be addressed together … Since 1996 the world semiconductor market has slumped … As a result, companies in this sector have been closing and cutting back around the world. Fujitsu and Siemens were two casualties of this change in world conditions. As they made clear, world conditions, and those alone, caused these closures. It would be totally dishonest to

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Germany

institutions and practices of German capitalism into question. At the heart of the neo-liberal challenge is an appeal to the flexibility and speed of response required by globalisation, and to the rigidity and sluggishness of state-societies that seek to protect their welfare and labour market institutions. In the realms of production and work, embedded social institutions and practices become synonymous with structural rigidities that undermine the potential competitiveness of the labour market through disincentives to work and constraints on business management: ‘Policies

in Globalisation contested