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The Marshall Plan films about Greece

). This was another facet of the ‘Greek exception’ (alongside it being the only post-Civil War European country to receive the MP aid), because most of the MP films about a specific country were directed by national filmmakers, sometimes building on the country’s cinematographic and documentary tradition, as in the cases of Italy (neorealism) and the UK (the British Documentary Movement). Many MP films

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Learning from the case of Kosovo

conflict and post-conflict dynamic in Kosovo. Although less visible in terms of media coverage and popular conceptions of the causes and key characteristics of the political violence there, economic motivations, the trade of goods and services to fund the war and the ongoing impact of such economic issues in the post-conflict phase are indeed defining features of all of the Balkan conflicts which took place throughout the 1990s (Andreas, 2004; Gouvnev, 2003; Hislope, 2002; Korovilas, 2002; Pugh and Cooper, 2004). In these conflicts, rebel factions engaged in illicit

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)

Irish MPs for Sinn Fein in the post-war election who refused to go to Westminster and promptly declared an Irish Republic. The subsequent Anglo-Irish War lasted until 1921, when the British Government and the Irish ‘government’ agreed to the partition of the island into a twenty-six-county Free State and a six-county Northern Ireland remaining within the UK, but with its own ‘devolved’ government at Stormont Castle

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Order and security in post-Cold War Europe

threat that German reunification presented to the European balance of power and, hence, to Britain’s position. Britain perceived NATO as the conditio sine qua non of the post-Cold War settlement. Britain insisted throughout the ‘2 plus 4’ negotiations that a unified Germany would have to be a NATO member and that NATO should remain the linchpin of European security. Throughout the Cold War, British defence policy had become so integrated with NATO policy that it was difficult to separate the two.63 In the mid-1990s, the British view started shifting towards supporting

in Theory and reform in the European Union

. These thinkers and their ideas have had a considerable influence on the development of the post-war consensus , and will no doubt continue to influence twenty-first century politics and economics. consensus A general agreement on basic principles, disagreement being confined to details. Government in Britain from 1945 to 1979 is often said to have been ‘consensual’ since most main parties

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s

films presented groups of children to harness humanitarian sentiment in support of the ideology and activities of the UN, and consider the critical response to (and a director’s reflections on) the juvenile actors who appeared in the films; while the figure of the child acquired new cultural and political significance in the era of the UN’s wartime and post-war humanitarian endeavours, the presentation

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)

could be adapted to a very positive role if socialist parties acquired power by constitutional means. This belief reached its apogee in Britain during and just after the Second World War. State planning helped to defeat Britain’s enemies and could, it was believed, win the war against ignorance, poverty and want at home. Social reformism was the dominant ideology throughout most of the post-war era

in Understanding political ideas and movements
The nature of the development-security industry

explanatory tools. Under orthodox political analyses, people’s identities and loyalties were seen as coalescing around the state. However, with the rise of intra-state conflict in the post-Cold War era, the primacy of national identities as an organising principle faded and ethnic identities became central to conflict analysis. Supporting such theories were wars in the former Yugoslavia and the Rwandan genocide. Based on Huntington-esque visions of a ‘clash of civilisations’ (Huntington, 1996), these theories are often closely attributed to the works of Robert Kaplan, whose

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)

Conservative leaders came to terms with the social-democratic welfare state by both accepting and extending it. Harold Macmillan, R. A. Butler and other modernisers within the Conservative Party ensured its post-war electoral successes. In the 1980s Mrs Thatcher struggled with what she perceived as the hegemony of socialist and social-democratic doctrine permeating all levels of British society. Her conservatism sought to link the

in Understanding political ideas and movements

rebellion's legacy and as their demands for an Irish Republic gathered momentum they displaced the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) as the mainstream representatives of nationalist Ireland at the 1918 General Election. 3 Sinn Féin's electoral performance heralded the arrival of a new, separatist force in Irish nationalist politics that hastened a conflict between Irish Republicanism and the British state after the war. However, economic changes in Ireland following the war also played a part in changing the colour of nationalist opinion in Ireland. This chapter focuses on

in Civilising rural Ireland