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Editor’s Introduction

humanitarian worker has never been so complex and dangerous. Many humanitarian narratives are fuelled by the fears of organisations: they see their working space reduced under the joint pressure of states increasingly asserting their sovereignty and of more frequent security incidents due to direct targeting, all happening in the context of widespread erosion of international norms ( Shaheen, 2016 ; Bouchet-Saulnier and Whittall, 2019 ; UN Security Council, 2019 ). In recent years, several

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

). While NGOs lay claim to a ‘non-governmental’ status, direct action thrived when donor sovereignty was, paradoxically, still able to cast a shadow. Given the refugee crisis, few can today contemplate the wretched state of ‘official’ humanitarianism without some disquiet. Despite what we may wish or demand, however, it is unlikely that significant improvement will occur any time soon. But to then conclude that humanitarianism is dead would be a mistake. While autonomous international direct action lies buried in the rubble of the West’s urbicidal wars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

the EU was not an attempt to erode the nation state, and as such a move to be resisted, but an attempt at strengthening it. Milward argues that the EU became an external support system for Europe’s nations, creating a new political consensus capable of rescuing the nation state but requiring a limited transfer of sovereignty. The policy competencies acquired by the Community reflected the desire by Europe’s nations to underpin and stabilise the consensus on which the European nation was rebuilt. The motivation for the post-war rescue of the nation state was

in Sports law and policy in the European Union

for the first EU conference Reconciling sport and law 197 on sport, held in Greece in May 1999. The conclusions of this exercise were used by the Commission to respond to the member states request, made at the December 1998 Vienna European Council that the Commission should write the Helsinki report on sport. This report states the current state of play. Despite the predominance of soft law as a tactic with which to influence the definition of sport in the EU, the activities of the socio-cultural coalition have had some practical effects. Above all, the sports

in Sports law and policy in the European Union