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also threatened the very raison d’être of the self-​regulatory regime established by the Motion Picture Association of America in 1968. When Nixon failed at the box office a year or so later, the harbingers of doom predicted a C on c l u sio n career decline. Understanding what happened thereafter has been at the forefront of many of the preceding pages. Studio projects did not vanish in the wake of the cumulative controversies surrounding JFK, Natural Born Killers and Nixon. Like his mentor Martin Scorsese, Stone succeeded in maintaining both a personal vision and

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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raising in Natural Born Killers. What seems clear is that the desire to criticise the establishment was not dissipating so much as it was finding new channels to express itself –​documentaries, media appearances, protests –​leaving the dramatic work not bereft of critique, but less obviously infused with it. Whatever the critical reservations, both Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Savages were about the desire for making money, the power and influence that money incites and buys, and the extent to which moral frameworks may be stretched to accommodate those desires

in The cinema of Oliver Stone