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German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

. Most of the more than 4200 comments posted within that time applaud Kellner and are informed by hatred. Some contain threats. For example, ‘Grillgucker’ wrote: ‘A bullet between the eyes would solve the problem.’ Others referred to her as Assel (woodlouse) or Zecke (tick), or to her and her supporters as Volksverräter , the term used in Nazi Germany for traitors. Carola Rackete may seem to be an unlikely role model for mainstream Germans, but her persona is also a small part of the reason for the traction the issue gained. For a start, she is comparatively

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

the same time, despite agency growth and extensive efforts to professionalise relief work, there was little commensurate increase in effectiveness ( Fiori et al ., 2016 ). Growing risk aversion and recourse to remote management, moreover, created problems of distancing and loss of familiarity ( Healy and Tiller, 2014 ). Distracted by debt-fuelled uncertainty, rather than an indignant citizenry, Western publics now present as so many disillusioned, ironic spectators ( Chouliaraki, 2013 ). Diplomatic influence has also declined ( Mair, 2013

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies
Jenny H. Peterson

control of resources, there is little change in how resources are acquired, with power and force still characterising who is able to control key resources as opposed to processes based on equity and justice. Of course in all cases, cautious operational actors will try to minimise such capture and prevent the above scenarios from developing. However, the use of short-term control strategies is often ineffective and the long-term hope that actors will eventually ‘fall in line’ with the fundamental principles of neoliberal economics is faulty, based more on desire than

in Building a peace economy?
Current policy options and issues
Jenny H. Peterson

the war economy might result in immediate, short-term successes, but could lead to long-term problems as the legitimacy of the state is questioned. The use of the military in transformation is further called into question by the fact that in many cases, the militaries are themselves part of the war economy. International military actors are also known to have become entangled in political economies of violence, contributing either directly or indirectly to illicit economic activity, as discussed in forthcoming chapters. This must cause one to question the motivation

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
A Party of the 99% and the Power of Debt
Tim Di Muzio and Richard H. Robbins

promote debt and inhibit exchange. By promoting local trade, Papavasiliou (2010: 210–211) suggests, we create direct relationships between producers and consumers that protect local economies from “free trade” commodities and services that don’t reflect the social and environmental costs of production and don’t pit the benefit of cheaper prices against the long-term costs of deteriorating local economic and social conditions. These twelve points are not a magical panacea for a perfect world free of all social ills and of the vast ecological problems we face. Nor, of

in Debt as Power
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
War, Debt, and Colonial Power
Tim Di Muzio and Richard H. Robbins

the Second World War. Over time, arguably, debt has become a more effective tool of wealth transfer and social transformation than war—though, of course, the two are intertwined in complex ways as the origins of the permanent public debt in England make clear. Since we cannot hope to provide a comprehensive study in such a short volume, what we intend to do is examine what we think are some of the most insightful and significant aspects of debt being mobilized as a technology of organized differential power. We begin by examining how the imposition of imperial

in Debt as Power
Open Access (free)
War, National Debt, and the Capitalized State
Tim Di Muzio and Richard H. Robbins

long-term national debt capable of being serviced by the ever-growing regressive taxation on the public (Dickson 1967; O’Brien 1988; Brewer 1989; Braddick 1996). But we should not theorize England as existing in isolation from the geopolitics, foreign markets, and the religious and dynastic power struggles of Europe and later, the world (Teschke 2009). As many scholars have observed, since the Norman Conquest of 1066, rulers actively centralized political power earlier than most continental nations (Wood 2002). Over time, the nobility was largely demilitarized 32

in Debt as Power
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

problems for policy makers are, therefore, how to deal with unemployment and how to finance the public debt which inevitably mounts up in a recession. It was also normal to reduce taxation at such times to try to boost consumption, so governments were able to make decisions which enjoyed short-term popularity. 3 Governments have conspicuously failed to maintain sustained periods of economic growth, at least until after 1995. Tempted by the availability of increased funds governments have tended to raise public expenditure and reduce taxation dramatically in the good

in Understanding British and European political issues
Neil McNaughton

, nevertheless, to pay back large portions of the national debt and avoid any short-term borrowing. In some ways he sacrificed some short-term spending options, in order to meet the criteria on debt. In other words, he favoured long-term benefits at the expense of short-term gains. By 2000, therefore, Britain had achieved the criteria with a good deal to spare. Since then it has been necessary to try to ensure that the economy did not stray from the rules. Up to 2002 at least, this proved relatively comfortable. It may not always be so. The five economic tests These are

in Understanding British and European political issues