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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

hyper-nationalist loop’ Hoeveler identified in The children of the abbey , these journeys reflect contemporary patterns of short- and long-term Irish and English migration and emigration, colonial expansion, and popular tourism routes. More importantly, at least in terms of this discussion, they speak to expanding bibliographic networks and the new transnational story of books themselves. Circulated throughout Britain, Europe, North and South America, and the British Empire, Roche's novels introduced readers to elements of Irish culture, history

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

, even contemporary, times. Although persuasive in their insistence on the renegotiation of both temporal and geographical gothic landscapes, Clery's arguments fail to account for the decisively British settings of texts such as The castles of Athlin and Dunbayne and The old English baron . This latter text, it is worth remembering, was one of the few novels actually to call itself ‘Gothic’, a term it applied specifically to the ‘times and manners’ of fifteenth-century Yorkshire. 10 The interest in indigenous scenery, not to mention characters and events

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

, regardless of blood kinship. 13 In this book I widen Herman’s definition to include any sexual behaviour (suggested or explicit) between people of any age involved in a familial relationship, regardless of a blood tie. My deployment of the term ‘incest taboo’ indicates established definitions of incest as a natural, universal proscription, a prohibition against violating positions of familial power and

in Gothic incest
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

’ appeared in a context in which several, often competing connotations of the term gothic held wide sway in the British popular imagination. It also bears repeating that, in Walpole's wake, very few writers adopted the terminology ‘gothic’ to describe their fiction, defying the common critical assumption that Walpole began a new literary craze with Otranto and, thus, gave birth to ‘the Gothic novel’ as we now know it. Such thinking fosters a neat and compartmentalised notion of the literary gothic and late eighteenth-century fiction as a whole that is at odds with the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

regulations aimed at optimum inbreeding’. 2 Shepher defines incest as ‘mating between relatives, called inbreeding’ and that ‘as a technical term, inbreeding is reserved for cases in which discernible traces can be followed back to common ancestors within two to three generations’. 3 Certainly cousins count in this regard, their shared relations being grandparents. But not everyone agrees with this

in Gothic incest