Search results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • short-term debt x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All

become conceptually inapplicable? For most observers the term ‘war’ remains good enough. In their view, war is well and alive. The bombing campaign in Kosovo may not correspond to the Clausewitzian definition of war, but war antedates the modern state by a good number of millennia, and is therefore more than the continuation of statist policies by other means. Hence, the concept’s transcendental nature

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds

–South conflict, as we use the term, came into being in the mid-1950s when the South began to organise itself politically. In its initial period, the conflict had two major manifestations: decolonisation and non-alignment. The significant point in relation to both is that during this early phase the South defined itself vis-à-vis the North primarily in ‘negative’ terms. In other words, the southern countries

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Open Access (free)
Reflections in a distorting mirror

, allied aircraft leave at short intervals. The British frigate HMS Splendid fires a salvo of cruise missiles. These events are broadcast in real time by satellite links all over the globe. These are the pictures that the public has been told to expect for weeks. It is the beginning of NATO’s Operation Allied Force, the long-announced answer of the international community to ethnic cleansing in

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

Arab regimes; in response, these regimes halted or slowed the liberalization process ( Ghadbian, 1997 ), and many adopted harsh measures against the Islamic movements, which has an oppressive effect on the rest of civil society as well (see Kienle, 1998 ). Preoccupied with the short-term, regime security remains the overriding priority for most, if not all, of the Arab states in the

in Redefining security in the Middle East