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The case for practice theory

. In turn, this enables semi-skilled web designers to integrate geolocation and geofencing capability onto cross-platform websites with ease (single webpage design for smartphone, tablet and laptop), including bespoke map layers for clients, and all achieved through a user-friendly digital map engine interface. Despite the increasing entanglement and ubiquity of digital and mobile media in everyday life (Urry, 2008; 2010; Castells, 2009), there is a limited amount of focus on digital map use from a sociological perspective. Research on digital maps is often

in Time for mapping

chapter 1. Despite IPE’s diverse roots in classical political economy, sociology and economic history (these are acknowledged more freely by the so-called ‘new’ IPE scholars), its relationship to IR is an important one to explore. The IPE orthodoxy reproduces significant elements of the realist/liberal IR synthesis, and in so doing establishes a particular understanding of the dynamics of transformation. Emerging at a time of change in world politics, nonetheless Amoore_Global_03_Ch2 39 6/19/02, 12:12 PM Globalisation contested 40 much of the emphasis was placed

in Globalisation contested

spatial media, new knowledge politics. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 38: pp. 544–559. Gerlach, J. (2014) Lines, contours, legends: Coordinates for vernacular mapping. Progress in Human Geography, 38: pp. 22–39. Grosz, E. (2005) Bergson, Deleuze and the becoming of unbecoming. Parallax, 11: pp. 4–13. Hennion, A. (2007) Those things that hold us together: Taste and sociology. Cultural Sociology, 1: pp. 97–114. Jackson, J. (1978) Transverse Mercator projection. Survey Review. 24: pp. 278–285. James, W. (2003) Essays in Radical Empiricism. New York

in Time for mapping
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

, 13(3): pp. 227–243. Callon, M. and Law, J. (2003) On qualculation, agency and otherness. [Online] Available at: www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/resources/sociology-online-papers/papers/callon-lawqualculation-agency-otherness.pdf (accessed 1 August 2016). Ciuccarelli, P., Lupi, G. and Simeone, L. (2014) Visualising the Data City: Social Media as a Source of Knowledge for Urban Planning and Management. Dordrecht: Springer. Crandall, J. (2010) The geospatialisation of calculative operations: Tracking, sensing and megacities. Theory, Culture and Society, 27(6): pp. 68

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future

://bds.sagepub.com/content/spbds/1/1/2053951 714528481.full.pdf (accessed 31 August 2016). Kitchin, R. and Dodge, M. (2007) Rethinking maps. Progress in Human Geography, 31(3): pp. 331–344. Latour, B. (1986) ‘Visualization and cognition: Thinking with eyes and hands’. In: Kuklick, H. (ed.) Knowledge and Society: Studies in the Sociology of Culture Past and Present Volume 6. New York: Jai Press, pp. 1–40. Massey, D. (1991) A global sense of place. Marxism Today, June: pp. 24–29. May, J. and Thrift, N. (eds) (2001) Timespace: Geographies of Modernity. London: Routledge. Olsson, G. (2007) Abysmal: A

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

), Panorama, 2000; Channel 4, 2000). The effect is to bring less comfortable and optimistic images of globalisation to our armchairs. At the same time, scholars within international political economy (IPE), international relations (IR) and sociology have called for the essence of politics to be restored to our understandings of globalisation and restructuring (Marchand and Runyan, 2000; Hay and Marsh, 1999; Bauman, 1998; Beck, 2000a). This book acknowledges and develops the emergent challenge to the economic and technologically determinist representations of globalisation

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

General Semantics. Krämer, S. (2006) The cultural techniques of time axis manipulation: On Friedrich Kittler’s conception of media. Theory, Culture and Society, 23(7–8): pp. 93–109. Lammes, S. (2011) ‘The map as playground: Location-based games as cartographical practices’. In: Think, Design, Play: Proceedings of the Fifth International DIGRA Conference. Utrecht, pp. 1–10. Latour, B. (1986) ‘Visualization and cognition: Thinking with eyes and hands’. In: Kuklick, H. (ed.) Knowledge and Society: Studies in the Sociology of Culture Past and Present Volume 6. New York: Jai

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

actions and activities of MNCs. Academic commentaries in IPE, economics, sociology and business studies have commonly singled out the MNC as the central site of production and work for the global economy and, therefore, as a leading agent of globalisation. As the primary vehicles for global forces, firms are represented as acting to intensify competition, reacting to technological imperatives and transmitting knowledge and practices of restructuring across national boundaries. Media commentaries variously depict the multinationals as ‘a powerful force for good’ (The

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency

with schooling (ILO Bureau of Statistics, 1998). 5 Harrod and O’Brien (2002) bring together the insights of labour studies, IPE, industrial relations, IRs and the sociology of work. The collection addresses the common problematics that global restructuring brings to these disciplines. 6 The ILO use the term ‘homeworker’ to define people working at home on tasks that are generally low paid, insecure and undertaken on a piecework basis, usually with no direct or formal contract. In contrast, a teleworker may be a manager, a senior professional or other employee who

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Britain

philosophy and political sociology – State v. Civil Society, public v. private, community v. market and so forth – is of little use here … Operationalising government has entailed the putting into place, both intentionally and unintentionally, of a diversity of indirect relations of regulation and persuasion that do not differentiate according to such boundaries. (Miller and Rose, 1990: 8) Programmes of policy designed to restructure social practices can thus be understood as incomplete, non-linear, and extending into and across the realms of state-society2, workplace

in Globalisation contested