. Quijano , A. ( 2000 ), ‘ Coloniality of Power and Eurocentrism in Latin America ’, International Sociology , 15 : 2 , 215 – 32 . Quijano , A. ( 2007 ), ‘ Coloniality and Modernity/Rationality ’, Cultural Studies , 21 : 2–3 , 168 – 78 . Rutazibwa , O. U. ( 2018 ), ‘ On Babies and Bathwater: Decolonizing International Development Studies ’, in de Jong , S. , Icaza , R. and Rutazibwa , O. U. (eds), Decolonization and Feminisms in Global Teaching and Learning ( London

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

children are more adept than adults at intuiting how computers work. This is because they have been designed to make them child’s play, so to speak. Bibliography Alcock , R. ( 2016 ), ‘ Politics and the New Unconscious: Thinking beyond Biopolitics ’ ( PhD thesis, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS), University of Bristol ). ALNAP ( 2009 ), ‘ 25th ALNAP Annual Meeting: Innovations Fair ’, November , www.alnap.org/ourwork/innovations/fair (accessed 5 April 2017 ). Amsden , A. H. ( 1990

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

Review , 3 September, http://m.cjr.org/164394/show/09239ac3b655cee6f021e5def773aad4/ (accessed 28 June 2019) . Turner , M. ( 1998 ), ‘ Kidnapping and Politics ’, International Journal of the Sociology of Law , 26 , 145 – 60 .

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

a majority of humanitarian practitioners, we can define it as a commitment to three things: the equal moral worth of all human lives (i.e. non-discrimination on principle), the moral priority of the claims of individuals over the authority claims of any collective entity – from nations to churches to classes to families – and a belief that as a moral commitment (one that transcends any sociological or political boundary) there is a just and legitimate reason to intervene in any and all circumstances where human beings suffer (even if

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

See http://healthcareindanger.org/ and http://notatarget.msf.org/ . 3 See www.aidworkersecurity.org . Bibliography Baines , E. and Paddon , E. ( 2012 ), ‘ “This Is How We Survived”: Civilian Agency and Humanitarian Protection ’, Security Dialogue , 43 : 3 , 231 – 47 . doi: 10.1177/0967010612444150 . Beerli , M. J. ( 2018 ), ‘ Saving the Saviors: Security Practices and Professional Struggles in the Humanitarian Space ’, International Political Sociology , 12 : 1 , 70 – 87 . doi: 10.1093/ips/olx023 . Bradley , M. ( 2013 ), ‘ International

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The article will present the findings of ethnographic research into the Colombian and Mexican forensic systems, introducing the first citizen-led exhumation project made possible through the cooperation of scholars, forensic specialists and interested citizens in Mexico. The coupling evolution and mutual re-constitution of forensic science will be explored, including new forms of citizenship and nation building projects – all approached as lived experience – in two of Latin America‘s most complex contexts: organised crime and mass death.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

The subject of forensic specialist‘s work with human remains in the aftermath of conflict has remained largely unexplored within the existing literature. Drawing upon anthropological fieldwork conducted from 2009–10 in three mortuary facilities overseen by the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), this article analyses observations of and interviews with ICMP forensic specialists as a means of gaining insight into their experiences with the remains of people who went missing during the 1992–95 war in BiH. The article specifically focuses on how forensic specialists construct and maintain their professional identities within an emotionally charged situation. Through analysing forensic specialists encounters with human remains, it is argued that maintaining a professional identity requires ICMP forensic specialists to navigate between emotional attachment and engagement according to each situation.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

This article will investigate the process of confronting death in cases of the disappeared of the last military dictatorship in Argentina. Based on the exhumation and identification of the body of a disappeared person, the article will reflect on how the persons social situation can be reconfigured, causing structural changes within the family and other groups. This will be followed by a discussion of the reflections generated by the anthropologist during his or her interview process, as well as an investigation into the authors own experiences in the field. This intimate relationship between the anthropologist and death, through the inevitable contact that takes place among the bodies, causes resonances in the context both of exhumations and of identifications in the anthropologists wider fieldwork.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal