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Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

, excludes any paternal or head of family position. The anthropological understanding of the incest taboo as necessary to culture advanced by Claude Lévi-Strauss is similarly argued for by Leslie White, who describes the taboo’s sociological impact as overcoming the human inclination to mate with intimate associates. While White, like Lévi-Strauss, views this taboo as necessary to ensure the growth of

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Grand and the sexual education of girls
Janet Beer and Ann Heilmann

to make informed choices. Grand and Gilman made central to their sociological writings and their fiction the terrible social consequences of the maintenance of girls in a state of ignorance. Throughout their work they invoke what was becoming a staple of feminist social theory, that the health of their respective nations was dependent upon the health of the female body. By extension, the abuse of that body is made symptomatic of the degenerate value systems of their societies. Through reference to questions of women’s dress, to male and female bodily hygiene, to the

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

scholars through restrictive gendered lenses, modern literary analyses of the genre have equally been constrained by feminist perspectives on incest derived from sociological and psychological theories. The understanding of incest as a typically violent or non-consensual act reflective of male power is typified by psychologists and sociologists such as Lena Dominelli and Julie Brickman, who view incest

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

_Ch7 119 22/3/02, 10:01 am 120 Cultural negotiations this emphasis on visible difference was ‘understandable at one level because of the systematic racism and discrimination which has characterized the experience of different collectivities of mainly British citizens who have migrated from the New Commonwealth and Pakistan, and their British born children’ (1995: 7). If the administering of cultural studies’ ‘turn’ towards questions of race and ethnicity was forged in the context of these particular sociological practices and historical circumstances, then it

in Across the margins
Cardboard publishers in Latin America
Lucy Bell

its semantic space with “rejects”, “wastrels”, “garbage”, “refuse” – with waste’ and ‘the destination of waste is the waste-yard, the rubbish heap’ (2004: 12; author’s italics). This division between valuable and worthless, included and excluded, is not a natural one, but rather a barrier erected by humans as a strategy to ensure the smooth running of the status quo. Bauman’s theory is clearly grounded in the discipline of sociology and has as its principal concern the connection between economic progress and social inequalities. In the introduction to his book, he

in Literature and sustainability
Open Access (free)
Agency in the Finnsburg episode
Mary Kate Hurley

’. 4 My interpretation of the Finnsburg episode owes much to Actor-Network theory and its understanding of collectivity as one way in which human and non-human entities might associate with one another in ways that supersede traditional ideas about agency. For a comprehensive study of collectivity and its relationship to human ideas of community, see Bruno Latour, Reassembling the social: an introduction to Actor-Network Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005); Michel Callon, ‘Some elements of a sociology of

in Dating Beowulf
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

the Gothic as displaying what E. J. Clery refers to as an ‘intrinsic “femaleness”’. 2 This leads to texts being viewed as part of a Male or Female Gothic form and their representations of father–daughter incest to be understood through these gendered divisions. As I suggested in the Introduction , the application of Freudian theory, sociological approaches to incest and structural anthropological

in Gothic incest
Alcuin Blamires

Hopkins has actually been predicated on a readiness to simplify the fiend’s role in the narrative, diminishing equivocations which (it will here be argued) make that role socially significant, at least in one of the two surviving manuscript versions. While the present essay is by no means hostile to religious interpretation – and will in fact propose some elaboration of it – a primary concern in my discussion will be to focus sociological implications in Sir Gowther. Here is a narrative that emphatically addresses what Stephen Knight considers to be endemic in the

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Between Adorno and Heidegger
Joanna Hodge

indeed to Adorno’s recasting of Kantian antinomy as dialectic of enlightenment see G. Rose, Hegel contra Sociology (London: Athlone, 1981). 8 The notion of antinomy here has a history going back to the writings of Kant, in his Critique of Pure Reason (1781, 1787), in which he analyses the antinomies of the understanding with respect to the deployment of concepts. Kant sets out an antinomy of practical reason in his Critique of Practical Reason, which concerns the different trajectories of an analysis of virtue and of happiness respectively. The argument considers the

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

critical/cultural institutions since the nineteenth century. Besides reinvigorating fields (such as geography and built environment) traditionally concerned with the social, cultural and political organisation of spatial practices, the spatial imagination also began to make itself felt in less obvious disciplines. Although its natural home may turn out to be cultural studies, other fields such as philosophy, sociology and (even) literature have rediscovered a spatial imagination informing their most basic assumptions and practices (Fitter 1995; Gregory 1994; Keith and

in Across the margins