Search results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • spiritual experience x
  • Film, Media and Music x
Clear All
Open Access (free)

wound of a rotten field in Vietnam.1 Oliver Stone penned these words, not as part of some reflective memoir of his experiences as a soldier in the Vietnam War, but immediately upon return from his first trip to Saigon in 1965 where, during a year away from his studies at Yale University, he had done nothing more dangerous than work as an English teacher in a Catholic school. US forces had begun arriving in Vietnam during that year as part of a dramatic escalation, although the ground war that would engulf American foreign policy for the next decade was not yet

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)

fashion.12 The space for polemical drama contracted for a time after 9/​11, and Stone concluded that documentary might offer the best opportunity to make his institutional point.13 Yet his own experience offered clear evidence of a growing problem for the USA as a functioning democracy: how to service the need for competing views and narratives –​the ‘marketplace of ideas’ –​in an environment where news and entertainment executives did not want to appear to be on the ‘wrong side’ of the administration’s ‘War on Terror’. Recognising, much less saying something of that

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs

contemporary experience and projection of British national identity and ideas of nationhood. These stories and characters are also of course endlessly recycled in the present period in other media as well as through the heritage industry. The monarchy, its history and its present manifestation, is clearly highly marketable, whether in terms of tourism, the trade in royal memorabilia or artefacts, or images of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)

provided the subject matter as well as the artistic chance to proffer political ideas and critiques, with an individual shooting style that began to hone his fabled visual immediacy. Unlike the firsthand experience in Vietnam, Stone’s education concerning Central American politics was gifted to him by an old friend, Richard Boyle, in dramatic fashion. A journalist whom he had known for a number of years, Boyle persuaded Stone to go on a trip to El Salvador in early 1985 to prepare the first draft of a screenplay about the violence that Boyle had seen there. What P o l

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)

-​liberal political and economic dominance, have come to appear as immutable facts rather than ideological preferences.9 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne Wall Street 124 In summer 1987, the US stock market was experiencing a boom that was coming close to eclipsing the previous record of the century, achieved in the five years preceding the crash of 1929. Just a few months earlier, in January 1987, the economist John Kenneth Galbraith had written what proved to be a prophetic warning about the direction that the market was taking. In particular, Galbraith detected a real

in The cinema of Oliver Stone