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David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

in the coalfields, however, we should be cautious about assuming homogeneity of experience. While the chapels of Methodists and other nonconformist sects provided ‘people the Disability, family and community 149 opportunity to gain confidence in themselves’, not everyone chose to avail themselves of these opportunities.107 The chapel vied with other forms of leisure activity in pit villages.108 The converted frequently saw themselves as engaged in a spiritual battle with non-believers who mocked or scoffed at their piety and while larger settlements might

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Open Access (free)
Hans Peter Broedel

TMM2 8/30/03 5:38 PM Page 10 2 Origins and arguments The Malleus is an idiosyncratic text, reflective of its authors’ particular experiences and preoccupations. It is, in the first place, an expression of a distinctively clerical worldview, the product of two lifetimes of academic, spiritual, and pastoral experience within the Church. But more than this, it is also the result of a peculiarly Dominican encounter between learned and folk traditions, an encounter determined in part by the demands of inquisitorial office, and in part by the requirements of

in The Malleus Maleficarum and the construction of witchcraft
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Christine E. Hallett

’s Progress.1 The romantic, narrative trope involved the testing of a (male) hero, through the ‘ordeal’ of his experience. If he could withstand this test, he would be transformed through ‘apotheosis’ – a process that mirrored religious ideas of transcendence. The hero was, therefore, not just courageous, but also saintly: morally and spiritually pure. For the young men of the war generation, combat was their ordeal; surviving it with ‘honour’ would result in self-transformation. 211 Volunteer girls Such ‘myths’ were exploded, after the war, by writers such as Siegfried

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

pursuing their own strategies. In the context of the twelfth-century evidence, the following discussion of women’s participation in spiritual relationships with churchmen argues that this was an important route for male–female interaction, and that this stimulated the production of T 30 patronage and power devotional literature written for specific women. Thus such relationships between churchmen and noblewomen were a route for indirect female influence in the context of the production of specific texts. The role of twelfth-century secular noblewomen in procuring

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

Francisco’s prominent ‘labour priest’ Peter Yorke forcefully impressed upon Maynooth’s Walter McDonald, when the latter visited America in 1900 – looked to Ireland and her church as to the ‘rising sun’; to them it was the revered monarch of an English-speaking Catholic kingdom.10 Though Yorke was chiding McDonald and the Irish church for not fully appreciating this fact, as Chapter Five demonstrated, it had in fact constructed and developed a powerful and widely accepted narrative of a ‘spiritual empire’ arising out of mass emigration. In that sense, the tensions the

in Population, providence and empire
Alison Forrestal

Council of Trent did not offer a comprehensive treatment of episcopacy in all its facets. Feeling insufficiently served by Trent, they themselves, therefore, had to supplement its shortcomings. For this reason, a number of works on the officium episcopi were published during the late sixteenth century, envisaged as guidebooks for bishops on the spiritual and practical aspects of their office. The driving forces behind these were, not surprisingly, prelates themselves. A number of them actually produced texts based on their own practical experiences and reflections and

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

200 DISABILITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION CONCLUSION The Industrial Revolution produced injury, illness and disablement on a large scale and nowhere was this more visible than in coalmining. While the loss of lives in large-scale mining disasters is still commemorated today, and forms part of the cultural memory of coalmining in areas where pits have long since closed down, there are no memorials to the many thousands who were disabled in the industry.1 Yet the experiences of those whose bones were broken, whose bodies were crushed, ‘lamed’ or maimed, or

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Open Access (free)
Roman ‘tyranny’ and radical Catholic opposition
S.J. Barnett

The Enlightenment and religion 5 Italy: Roman ‘tyranny’ and radical Catholic opposition This final case study provides another different context of the Enlightenment. The experience of Catholic dissidents in the Italian peninsular provides some similarities with the struggles in France, but the very different politico-religious context of the Italian peninsular means that differences tend to outweigh similarities. Differences aside, the point of this chapter is again to illustrate that broad politico-religious struggle – rather than the actions of the

in The Enlightenment and religion
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

orthodoxy of the Catholic Church in Ireland, which both fed on and fed into the notion of a ‘spiritual empire’ with Ireland at its centre. One as yet rather uncertain aspect of this appears to correlate with Irish evangelical experience. Transformations in religious practice can be diffuse and their causes difficult to pinpoint. Yet, if there were, as noted, clear transnational elements to the 1859 revival, in the sense that it took place (and was understood as taking place) within a wider evangelical 205 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 205 15/09/2014 11:47 Population

in Population, providence and empire