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Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies
Jenny H. Peterson

the policy: the international financial institutions backed by Western governments, which insist on the inclusion of privatisation as a condition for financial support and technical and economic assistance. (1994: 83–89) Evidence from a wide variety of documents and agreements regarding economic reconstruction in Kosovo confirm the plan of bringing Kosovo into the global capitalist economy. Although the PISG was not able to negotiate formally with IFIs given the lack of statehood, the World Bank had several ongoing projects in Kosovo prior to Kosovo’s declaration

in Building a peace economy?
Current policy options and issues
Jenny H. Peterson

schemes are more generally referred to as Commodity Tracking Systems, but are increasingly being considered in the management of conflict commodities (Crossin, Hayman and Taylor, 2003). The Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) is the pre-eminent example of this approach. After years of negotiation between relevant stakeholders, including the governments of diamond producing and importing states, the diamond industry and various NGOs, the KPCS came into effect in 2003 and sought to end the relationship between the trade of rough diamonds and violent conflict in

in Building a peace economy?
Eunice Goes

subplot deals with the link between ideas on community and socialism. The third subplot concerns the narrative on social exclusion–social inclusion, which sheds light on New Labour’s approach to poverty and social inequalities. The final section assesses the impact of these ideas on New Labour’s ideology and argues that New Labour did not endorse communitarianism, but simply used

in The Third Way and beyond
David Morrison

argues that promoting equality means more than merely promoting equality of opportunity 13 and that equality should be seen as inclusiveness. 14 He explains: ‘Inclusion in its broadest sense refers to citizenship, to the civil and political rights and obligations that all members of a society should have not just formally but as a reality of their lives.’ 15 It is notable that

in The Third Way and beyond
Elana Wilson Rowe

forthcoming and welcoming of Asian states’ Arctic interests. Norway proclaimed its support of the Asian states’ inclusion on the Arctic Council early and continued to play a role in the states’ ultimate acceptance and inclusion in Kiruna (MFA, Norway, 2011:  78; Bekkevold and Offerdal, 2014; Lunde, 2016). Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Sweden were also openly welcoming of non-​Arctic states’ applications to the Arctic Council after the Nuuk ministerial meeting in 2011. Denmark reiterated its support for observers in 2013 and noted that it looked forward to welcoming the EU

in Arctic governance
Sarah Hale

’s first years in office – when claims about its communitarianism were at a height. Furthermore, help for the worse-off has been in the form of the minimum wage, child-care provision and tax credits, all of which are available only to those in work, thus underscoring the conception of citizenship and inclusion rejected by Taylor. Neither Taylor’s theory in general nor his specific

in The Third Way and beyond
Open Access (free)
Theorising Arctic hierarchies
Elana Wilson Rowe

, 2013: 205). One scholar describes the USA’s position as a ‘take it or leave it one’ on the points of a looser declaration rather than by a charter or convention document, and functioning without a secretariat (Scrivener, 1999). In the same negotiations process, the US also insisted on the inclusion of additional indigenous peoples’ organisations from Alaska Athabaskan and Aleut groups, over the objections of the indigenous peoples’ organisations already within AEPS who were concerned about the watering out of their positions with added numbers (Scrivener, 1999

in Arctic governance