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Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory

remote, David’s television literacy is mysteriously transposed and tested in the world of Pleasantville itself. Together with his street-wise and sexually assertive sister (Reese Witherspoon), David and Jennifer are inexplicably confronted with, and literally drawn inside, the monochrome world of sitcom ‘gee-whizzery’. Colour is central to Pleasantville ’s narrative strategy. Black and white is a visual

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Pat Jackson’s White Corridors

mid-1930s and staying on throughout the war after its rebranding as Crown, and the denial of music is clearly part of a strategy for giving a sense of documentary-like reality to the fictional material of White Corridors . There is a certain paradox here, in that actual documentaries, like newsreels, normally slap on music liberally. To take two submarine-centred features, released almost

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Civil rites of passage

the world in the 1950s and 1960s, and it is being replayed as a cinematic event. The interrelationship of popular memory and cinematic representations finds a telling case study in the civil rights era in the American South. This chapter assesses what films made after the civil rights era of the 1950s and 1960s express about the failure of the Movement to sustain and be sustained in its challenges to

in Memory and popular film

image. While avoiding what Giselle Bastin has described as the ‘low-quality’ impersonations of the Princess in the many television biopics of the 1980s and 1990s, 12 this strategy makes Diana history, in both the literal and figurative sense, while paradoxically enlivening the very traditional genre which it deploys to vindicate the Queen. Throughout The Queen news broadcasts on television screens and

in The British monarchy on screen
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf

’ (killing of officers by their own men) in Vietnam. Michael Klein suggests that ‘the death toll from fragging by soldiers disaffected with the war may be as high as 5 per cent of the total loss of life in combat sustained by the US armed forces during the war’. 37 There is also the known instances of mutinies. Perhaps the most famous example is the mutiny of marines at Da Nang in 1968. Finally, to counter

in Memory and popular film
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The Queen in Australia

division negotiated commercial exhibition for major productions where possible, and also supplied 16mm films to various cohorts of ‘opinion leaders’ (such as diplomatic circles and universities), as well as to schools and community groups. 28 Simon Potter notes a broad pattern of institutionalised inter-connection in the Commonwealth media/information field that played a role ‘in sustaining a sense of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)

Hollywood in tow, reasserted its hegemony in the post-​Vietnam era. American global strategy was made manifest in a series of interventions in Haiti, Panama, Somalia and the Balkans in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Most notable was the Wa r Born on the Fourth of July and Heaven on Earth 41 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 42 incursion into Kuwait and Iraq, where live-​action news feeds of missiles closing in on their targets became the visual motif of this new panoptic military ascendancy. The advocates of this reinvented interventionist stance also found a

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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An allegory of imperial rapport

wide-angle lenses (using ARRI Master Prime lenses), his strategy being to not only produce large character portraits but to also bring in the background. 6 Others have noted the unconventional framing in the scene where Bertie and Lionel discuss Bertie’s unhappy childhood – reverse shots displace both characters to opposite edges of the frame, emphasising the social distance between them. For Jason

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)

uncomfortable emotional space, as Jake’s persona becomes clearer. He explains almost in exasperation: The devastating and jumbled emotional turmoil of the rant underscores Grace’s situation. She is trapped and in search of any way out. Abused by her husband/​father and used by Sheriff Potter (Powers Boothe), she falters even as she tries to believe in Bobby. He is flaky and self-​centred, and there is no evidence that she sees him as anything more than her ride out of town –​but she is unable to sustain the trust that would be required for him to make good, even on this

in The cinema of Oliver Stone

a tradition of ‘retrovisions’, 89 to borrow Cartmell and Hunter’s term. Ultimately, though, The Tudors is inimitable in that it sustains its ‘retrovision’ for four seasons and deliberately aims for controversy over respectability in its depiction of Henry VIII throughout. As Wray states, it stands as ‘an unprecedentedly ambitious attempt to televise history’. 90 It questions not just how we see

in The British monarchy on screen