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The complexities of collaborative authorship

Bali that participatory and reflexive authorial strategies are most developed. All but one of these five films concern Jero Tapakan, a traditional healer who seeks to help her clients through contacting the spirit world to establish whether their illnesses and misfortunes have a spiritual origin or are due to a failure to make appropriate ritual offerings. But she also diagnoses and treats more physical illnesses through massage therapy, and prescribes certain herbal remedies that she herself prepares. In the first of the films about Jero

in Beyond observation
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Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory

remote, David’s television literacy is mysteriously transposed and tested in the world of Pleasantville itself. Together with his street-wise and sexually assertive sister (Reese Witherspoon), David and Jennifer are inexplicably confronted with, and literally drawn inside, the monochrome world of sitcom ‘gee-whizzery’. Colour is central to Pleasantville ’s narrative strategy. Black and white is a visual

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography

particular conception of ethnography. This is a second sense in which this book could be considered no more than a partial historical account. In fact, the whole book should be regarded not as a dispassionate chronicle but rather a sustained argument in favour of a very particular approach to ethnographic film-making. Authorship, praxis, observation In pursuit of this argument, the book is divided into four parts. In the first, in the course of seven chapters, I offer an overview of (predominantly) English-language ethnographic film

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Pat Jackson’s White Corridors

mid-1930s and staying on throughout the war after its rebranding as Crown, and the denial of music is clearly part of a strategy for giving a sense of documentary-like reality to the fictional material of White Corridors . There is a certain paradox here, in that actual documentaries, like newsreels, normally slap on music liberally. To take two submarine-centred features, released almost

in British cinema of the 1950s

crew, who had largely remained silent apart from interviews or voice-over, or in certain exceptional situations, as at the very beginning of The Family , when Paul Watson is shown explaining the ‘ground rules’ of the filming to the assembled Wilkins family. 7 By contrast, in accordance with the authorial strategies typically associated with Observational Cinema, Dineen often speaks in a conversational manner with her subjects from behind the camera that she herself is

in Beyond observation

. Indeed, the latter part of Paul's review, much less frequently – if ever – cited, suggests precisely this for, in seeming direct contradiction to his earlier strictures on the role of film in anthropology, he then proceeds to praise in generous terms what he sees as the sustained ‘aesthetic and intellectual continuity’ of The Rendille , in particular its ‘constant, but unobtrusive, awareness of the physically close relationships and symbiotic interdependence of people and stock’. He comments with approval on the way in

in Beyond observation
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The principles of Observational Cinema

this project, The Village , was released in 1968 and had a running time of 70 minutes, distilled from fifteen hours of rushes. In effect, this represented the first sustained attempt to put into practice the principles of Observational Cinema that were being developed through the Ethnographic Film Program. There was no script and Hockings and McCarty made no attempt to direct the subjects by telling them what to do or say, nor did they ask them to repeat an action or a comment in order to do a

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Civil rites of passage

the world in the 1950s and 1960s, and it is being replayed as a cinematic event. The interrelationship of popular memory and cinematic representations finds a telling case study in the civil rights era in the American South. This chapter assesses what films made after the civil rights era of the 1950s and 1960s express about the failure of the Movement to sustain and be sustained in its challenges to

in Memory and popular film

image. While avoiding what Giselle Bastin has described as the ‘low-quality’ impersonations of the Princess in the many television biopics of the 1980s and 1990s, 12 this strategy makes Diana history, in both the literal and figurative sense, while paradoxically enlivening the very traditional genre which it deploys to vindicate the Queen. Throughout The Queen news broadcasts on television screens and

in The British monarchy on screen
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf

’ (killing of officers by their own men) in Vietnam. Michael Klein suggests that ‘the death toll from fragging by soldiers disaffected with the war may be as high as 5 per cent of the total loss of life in combat sustained by the US armed forces during the war’. 37 There is also the known instances of mutinies. Perhaps the most famous example is the mutiny of marines at Da Nang in 1968. Finally, to counter

in Memory and popular film