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Gareth Millward

introduced to a receptive public. Indeed, for the high-profile ones (such as Salk's poliomyelitis vaccine) there was active demand from citizens. But such demand was also tempered by concerns about other risks, such as vaccine damage, convenience and financial sustainability. Thus, the public played a key role in shaping public health authorities’ priorities. The general trend was toward the increased use of vaccination, in terms both of the number of vaccines available and of percentage uptake among the population. This relationship between the

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

rights to forego vaccination. If vaccination drove even more employees away from fever hospitals, that buffer might not exist at all. 1950s propaganda and education campaign The outbreaks in 1949 and 1950 did not substantially alter the Ministry's approach to routine vaccination. The Ministry responded to individual enquiries and stressed the need for health visitors to use a ‘personal approach’ with parents to convince them of the benefits for their child. 61 There was, however, no sustained propaganda campaign. The complications associated with mass vaccination

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

transmission. 59 The production of diphtheria anti-toxoid and its use in mass immunisation campaigns was, as Esteban Rodríguez-Ocaña has described it, ‘the crucial link between public excitement about Pasteur's rabies vaccine and the establishment of national campaigns against tuberculosis, sustaining the development of bacteriology-based public health service’. 60 The growing power of biomedical sciences was thus embodied in these new technologies that borrowed from generally accepted principles of immunity. 61 Through example, mass vaccination

in Vaccinating Britain