Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 36 items for :

  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

tension had all become associated with one peculiarly emotive issue, sexual behaviour. This was because sex workers had come to rival coffee as Buhaya’s most famous export. Anxiety about prostitution justified a tendency towards radical interventionism in the realm of sexuality that was sustained by evolving political, moral and economic debates right through to decolonisation. 6 Ethnographers and officials

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts

. In the north, the central hospital in Livingstonia became a major regional healthcare facility during the 1910s and 1920s. 21 Perhaps unsurprisingly, in the Shire Highlands, missionary medicine tended to focus on African male workers. A clear majority of the early in-patients at Blantyre were male. As Rennick has argued, the colonial settlers became important ‘refereeing agents’ for the Blantyre

in Beyond the state
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

other African territories (particularly South Africa), in which Indian workers and traders were increasingly portrayed as dirty and pathological bodies, while Indian doctors, precisely because they held some social status, were evidently felt to be challenging to white settler ideals of how the elite and responsible echelons of Kenyan society should be constituted. Telling the little-known story about the

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

practice. Half-time workers If the everyday relationship between medical missionaries and the Colonial Medical Service had been relatively unproblematic, it was to emerge as an area requiring definition and regulation in the early 1920s. Faced with the need to increase the size and scope of government medical provision at minimal cost, administrators started to attempt to harness

in Beyond the state
Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika

the ultimate source of social welfare for Africans. In colonial territories with significant commercial concerns (plantations, mines and other large-scale industrial activity), private practices for workers and worker families played a greater role. But in much of sub-Saharan Africa, with some notable exceptions, missions were significant providers of healthcare services for Africans throughout the

in Beyond the state
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain

Jamaica. For most of the time in the US he was part of America’s black proletariat, earning his living, as his friend Max Eastman put it, ‘in every one of the ways that northern Negroes do, from “pot-wrestling” in a boarding-house kitchen to dining-car service on the New York and Philadelphia Express’. McKay regarded himself as ‘not only a Negro but also a worker’, and we might

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)

the Moscow Soviet – his lack of Russian notwithstanding. He conducted many clandestine missions throughout Europe, and perhaps beyond, though he made the port-city and Communist stronghold of Hamburg his principal base, organising there in July 1930 the first international conference of Negro workers, a ramshackle affair but a landmark nonetheless. A year later, from Hamburg, he was editing for RILU

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)

research was needed to transform sugar from foodstuff to industrial starting compound. Laboratory investigation was endowed with the power to reverse the long decline of the Caribbean. This chapter will show how concerns at the Colonial Office around 1940 about the economic future of the British West Indies were expressed as concerns about the future of the sugar industry. While distress was not limited to workers in this industry, and sugar was no longer the principal export of all British Caribbean colonies, it was conditions in this industry that

in Science at the end of empire

-of-Spain seat as a candidate for the United Front (UF), beating the famous nationalist leader Uriah Butler, who had contested this seat rather than fight in the oilfield area of the south where his party, the British Empire Workers and Citizens Home Rule Party, had its strongest support. The UF had been formed in early 1946 through the consolidation of a number of left-wing organisations. In 1946, 47 per cent of the population of the colony were black, 35 per cent were East Indian and the remainder were described in the census of that year as mixed, white, Syrian, Chinese or

in Science at the end of empire
The canadianizing 1920s

salvation for redundant female workers in the stagnant postwar economy lay in the British colonies, where there was still an overabundance of men. 5 The idea of ‘redundant women’ was not a result solely of First World War battlefield losses. The mythology had been popping up in Britain since the 1850s, and was associated not just with Britain’s changing social dynamics but with the populating of the Empire

in Female imperialism and national identity