Working memories
Author: David Calder

Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space explores how street theatre transforms industrial space into postindustrial space. Deindustrializing communities have increasingly turned to cultural projects to commemorate industrial heritage while simultaneously generating surplus value and jobs in a changing economy. Through analysis of French street theatre companies working out of converted industrial sites, this book reveals how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. The book argues, firstly, that deindustrialization and redevelopment rely on the spatial and temporal logics of theatre and performance. Redevelopment requires theatrical events and performative acts that revise, resituate, and re-embody particular pasts. The book proposes working memory as a central metaphor for these processes. The book argues, secondly, that in contemporary France street theatre has emerged as working memory's privileged artistic form. If the transition from industrial to postindustrial space relies on theatrical logics, those logics will manifest differently depending on geographic context. The book links the proliferation of street theatre in France since the 1970s to the crisis in Fordist-Taylorist modernity. How have street theatre companies converted spaces of manufacturing into spaces of theatrical production? How do these companies (with municipal governments and developers) connect their work to the work that occurred in these spaces in the past? How do those connections manifest in theatrical events, and how do such events give shape and meaning to redevelopment? Street theatre’s function is both economic and historiographic. It makes the past intelligible as past and useful to the present.

A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

, respond to and ease suffering in times of crisis, taking a moment to reflect on various aspects of that response and to consider the humanity within humanitarian action can only be a positive step. Put simply, there is great value in asking what happened? How can we translate the considerable knowledge that has been accumulated in the humanitarian sector (from institutional memory to experiential learning) into informed decision-making at home and in the field? Could a more

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

(Grotius, Rousseau and Vatel, most notably). The safeguards granted to prisoners of war by the 1929 Convention were already a part of the 1785 Treaty of Amity and Commerce between Prussia and the United States, and long before the humanitarian conventions were formalised as such, the treatment of POWs had become a key political issue with the rise of mass military mobilisations ( Farré, 2014 ). In the memory of the humanitarian movement, the Battle of Solferino stands as the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

interventions. Nonetheless, translation should not be examined purely in terms of efficiency or cost, as it is an important means of upholding the dignity of individuals and communities impacted by crises, removing feelings of disadvantage among those working in aid organisations who are not from the dominant (typically Anglophone) linguistic culture, and promoting the development of trust between involved parties ( Crack et al. , 2018 ). The scarcity and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

disillusioned with the truncated horizons of the New Left and resigned to the triumph, for a generation or two, of welfare capitalism ( Meiksins Wood, 1995 ). Before this, global humanitarianism had been a largely religious exercise, an extension of Christian ministry ( Barnett, 2011 ), while human rights barely registered on the world stage ( Moyn, 2010 ). From the 1970s on, the humanist international became a place where disillusioned rebels could continue to work, albeit in a new idiom, for those who suffered. They ceased working to any great extent on their

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

information can also help doctors to decide which patient needs emergency service as the device can provide real-time data. Also, in the case of routine monitoring, a flash memory is added with the device to store the data taken from the human organs. ( Rashid et al. , 2017: 144 ) There is often a disconnect between the technology and its social context. For example, a presentation of several ‘rescue-wearables’ on a trade website

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Working memory
David Calder

Introduction: working memory Sauver l’usine, c’est sauver la mémoire ouvrière de ce quartier, se rappeler que ce quartier est un quartier ouvrier, que ce n’est pas rien, que les ouvriers existent, sont encore là, même si on voudrait parfois nous faire croire qu’ils ont disparu. […] Quoi faire de cette histoire pour ceux qui sont là, aujourd’hui, que cela leur serve, qu’ils puissent s’appuyer dessus? To save the factory is to save the working-class memory of this neighbourhood, to recall that this neighbourhood is a working-class neighbourhood, that it isn

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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Northern Irish fiction after the Troubles
Neal Alexander

memorial to the dead: She imagined a room, a perfectly square room. Three of its walls, unbroken by windows, would be covered by neat rows of names, over three thousand of them; and the fourth wall would be nothing but a window. The whole structure would be built where the horizon was low, the sky huge. It would be a place which afforded dignity to memory, where you could bring your anger, as well as your grief.6 Cate’s imagined memorial combines the functions of remembrance and catharsis, providing a space for the working out of anger, pain and conflict rather than

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
The imaginary archaeology of redevelopment
David Calder

observe how a theatre company engages with a working-class, industrial neighbourhood immediately before and during redevelopment. PlayRec and SPP restage the excavation of the industrial past. Archaeologists recognize excavation as both destructive and creative. Anxiety about the destructive nature of archaeological work pervaded the field’s scholarly discourse throughout the twentieth century. 100 Working memories Archaeologist Gavin Lucas identifies ‘a critical paradox of intrusive fieldwork, that in order to understand something, we have to destroy that very

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland
Jelena Tošić

. Benhabib, Seyla (2002) The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Blumi, Isa (2003) ‘Contesting the edges of the Ottoman Empire: rethinking ethnic and sectarian boundaries in the Malësore 1878–1912’, International Journal for Middle East Studies, 35: 237–256. Bougarel Xavier, Elissa Helms and Ger Duijzings (eds) (2007) The New Bosnian Mosaic: Identities, Memories and Moral Claims in a Post-War Society. London: Ashgate. Bushati, Hamdi (1998) Shkodra dhe Motet: Traditë, Ngjarje, Njerëz (Velimi I) [Shkodra and

in Migrating borders and moving times