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Catherine Baker

White Innocence , which builds on Said's reference to imperial fiction and poetry as a cultural archive via Ann Stoler's sense of the archive as a ‘repository of memory’ (Stoler 2009 : 49 in Wekker 2016 : 19) for everyday legacies of imperial rule in postcolonial metropoles. It is located in many things, in the way we think, do things, and look at the world, in what we find (sexually) attractive, in how our affective and rational economies are organized and intertwined. Most important, it is

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

working as seamen on ocean-going bulk transport ships registered in Liberia or Panama. Until the late twentieth century neglect and degradation have been the historical experiences of each tiny populated Grenadine island. This neglect took the form of a lack of basic amenities as a result of mainland uninterest from successive Government administrations, both colonial and postcolonial. The island of Canouan

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Catherine Baker

through US military contractors for service occupations or translation/interpreting had more sustained contact with US troops. One ex-interpreter, ‘Tarik’, whom I interviewed for a project on translation/interpreting and peacekeeping, remembered that among the US Army units posted to his Tuzla base had been an ‘all-black’ unit from Arkansas. He adapted to their African-American Vernacular English while building what he recalled as his best working relationship, where after a few months he already felt ‘not [like] a Bosnian guy who's here to help

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

belonging already recognised as inescapable and constitutive for so many other areas: how has ‘race’, a notion propagated to support European colonial power and domination, manifested in the Yugoslav region, where attachment to ‘Europe’ informs so many forms of collective identity and where historical memories of being imperial subjects not imperial rulers inform so many narratives of national pasts? The Bulgarian scholar Miglena Todorova, writing in 2006, could already argue south-east European studies was separating its region from the rest of the globe by concentrating

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Saurabh Dube

natures as well as their entwined expressions. At the same time, the work highlights that such segregation of the past from the present, although assumed to be principally temporal, nonetheless embodies profoundly spatial attributes. Thus, the place-holding presumption of a homogeneous history allows an imaginary yet palpable West – its singular temporal trajectory working in tandem with its exclusive

in Subjects of modernity
Catherine Baker

-antagonisms frame crowding out other topics, or willed exclusion – is just as problematic as the forgetting of coexistence across ethnonational boundaries and the marginalisation of how reformable Yugoslav socialism, even in the early 1980s, still seemed to be (topics that the ‘social inequalities’ turn in late Yugoslav history recovers). The literary theorist Vedrana Veličković, working on postcommunism and postcolonialism, amplifies Rada Iveković's sadness at disappearing Yugoslav translations of key anti-colonial works and adds her own memory, fifty years since Lumumba

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Philip Nanton

says, to counter a skin condition). He speaks in a thick Vincentian working-class accent with a raspy, smoke-filled voice that at times slurs his words. Now, in another manifestation, he has become an articulate, working-class intellectual. He has written a number of articles arguing for acceptance of ganja use and legalisation of the growing of the plant. He has jointly authored official investigations

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis
Andrew Bowie

memory or for decision preceding an action – ‘go back into itself ’, and thus have a ‘being for itself (1971 I pp. 458–9): ‘I and activity which returns into itself are completely identical concepts’ (1971 I p. 462). As Fichte suggests (and the adherents of the myth of artificial intelligence would do well to listen): 74 Aesthetics and subjectivity ‘The mechanism cannot grasp itself, precisely because it is a mechanism. Only free consciousness can grasp itself ’ (1971 I p. 510). This grasping of itself cannot be the result of anything which determines the I to grasp

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

tries to recover what might have been. The anthropologist searches for the elders with the richest memories of days gone by, assiduously records their ethnographic texts, and then puts together between the covers of their monographs a picture of the natives of Anthropologyland. The peoples of Anthropologyland, like all God’s Children got shoes, got

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

, continuity is generally more fragile in federations and unions with derivative citizenship than in unitary states. The threat of breakup might linger on as a historical memory of past conflicts or be a present fear that undermines trust and the willingness to collaborate. Under such conditions, secession or partition into independent states, as well as merger into a unitary democratic polity, imply the discontinuity of self-government of either the

in Democratic inclusion