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The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa
Anna Greenwood and Harshad Topiwala

Colonial Medical Service, in terms of training and employing more African dressers; but at the same time (and with no apparent sense of contradiction) as the Service became more inclusive towards Africans, it became less inclusive towards Indians. This implies that, despite British rhetoric, something more complicated than progressive racial inclusion was going on. In key ways, Indians working in roles

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940
Yolana Pringle

reflective of a more general collaboration between mission and government doctors that was not regarded as exceptional. Indeed, before the 1920 s, the close working relationship between the doctors at Mengo Hospital and the Colonial Medical Service caused little controversy; while the anti-venereal, motherhood, and education campaigns were accompanied by negotiations on the boundaries between mission and

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

adequately caused growing disquiet amongst many Ganda. Rumours of sorcery abounded, parents regularly removed their children from medical care before treatment was completed and, when riots broke out in 1949 due primarily to Ganda farmers’ and workers’ sense of political and economic marginalisation, biomedical researchers working on kwashiorkor were targeted. Medical research was suspended for a period

in Beyond the state
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge
Katie Pickles

Through its war memorials, the IODE has used memory to produce identity, instilling a shared sense of the past and defining aspirations for the future. 1 In recent years historians have placed renewed emphasis on the role of memory in the making and re-making of history. Raphael Samuel’s innovative work has destabilized memory as fixed or singular, and has brought into question

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history
Bill Schwarz

activity, despite the magnitude of the great migration from the Caribbean. No cafés or book or record shops or dance halls carry commemorative plaques, or retain a place in the larger collective memory. 1 Even educated opinion can still profess a certain puzzlement that there could be such a thing as an intellectual tradition deriving from the experience of the Caribbean, testament to the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

creoles, ‘ SEE Caribb (or any?) culture’, does, as Brathwaite argues, depend on their ethnicity, historical experience and cultural memories of the Caribbean. It will also depend on which island or part of the mainland they come from. One further way in which Jean Rhys only ambiguously belongs to the West Indies is that the term – West Indies – is traditionally used only of the British Caribbean. Her

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

privileges of empire were their due. 1 These photographic images, and those of the flickering, monochrome newsreels which accompany them, have now come to compose a social archive. They serve to fix the collective memory of the momentous transformation of postwar migration. At the same time, however, their very familiarity works to conceal other angles of vision. We become so habituated to the logic of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

to overcome what they perceived to be the unwelcome connotations of ‘empire’. The now peculiar and elusive name conjures up faint memories and suspected intrigue, with little actually known of the IODE and its vital place in twentieth-century imperial history. In this book I redress the neglect and place the IODE in the spotlight, resurrecting it from a contemporary shadow of a presence. I position

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

mine and, in fact, have even found it. I see it was from the SOSBW, which I think stood for the Society for the Overseas [ sic ] Settlement of British Women. Perhaps this indicated that Britain wanted to get rid of us rather than Canada wanted us as immigrants.’ 5 That the tour was intended to encourage Empire unity is supported by memories of the tour. Beatrice King, another of the girls

in Female imperialism and national identity
Katie Pickles

fairly egalitarian lines. In a written retrospective she held that she had founded her ‘Daughters on a new principle, namely, to prove what could be done without asking for high patronage’, but capitulated when those working with her demanded a patroness. 14 Known for her own patriotic and charitable work, Lady Minto became the first honorary president. The first president of the IODE, from 1901 to

in Female imperialism and national identity