Open Access (free)
An actor-network theory perspective

In today’s world, we are offered a constantly expanding number of technologies to integrate into our lives. We now utilise a range of interconnected technologies at work, at home and at leisure. The realm of sport is no exception, where new technologies or enhancements are available to athletes, coaches, scientists, umpires, governing bodies and broadcasters. However, this book argues that in a world where time has become a precious commodity and numerous options are always on offer, functionality is no longer enough to drive their usage within elite sports training, competition and broadcasting. Consistent with an actor-network theory approach as developed by Bruno Latour, John Law, Michele Callon and Annemarie Mol, the book shows how those involved in sport must grapple with a unique set of understandings and connections in order to determine the best combination of technologies and other factors to serve their particular purpose. This book uses a case study approach to demonstrate how there are multiple explanations and factors at play in the use of technology that cannot be reduced to singular explanations like performance enhancement or commercialisation. Specific cases examined include doping, swimsuits, GPS units, Hawk-Eye and kayaks, along with broader areas such as the use of sports scientists in training and the integration of new enhancements in broadcasting. In all cases, the book demonstrates how multiple actors can affect the use or non-use of technology.

choices about utilising various practitioners. The cases are similar in the sense that neither the rowers nor the gymnasts have formal access to sports medicine support as part of their training regime, meaning that both the gymnasts and rowers (and/or at times their coaches) must make their own arrangements in order to access medical support. The study of medicine through ANT: the work of Annemarie Mol A theorist who has received significant acclaim for her ANT-orientated work is Annemarie Mol. In

in Sport and technology
Ontological coordination and the assessment of consistency in asylum requests

). How assessments of inconsistency manage to achieve truth-value is the main puzzle that concerns me here. The argument put forward in this chapter is twofold. First, I borrow the notion of ontological coordination from the work of Dutch philosopher Annemarie Mol (1999, 2002a) to spell out a further reason to doubt the use of inconsistency as justification for denial. I argue

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)

how the heterogeneous or multiple aspects of a particular technique or technology can become concealed from view once it stabilises. The way that multiplicities become understood as singular and stabilised has been of particular interest to the ANT researcher Annemarie Mol, whose work on atherosclerosis demonstrated the way that the disease existed in multiple forms and incorporated multiple meanings despite being assumed to be singular (Mol, 2002). In sport, a similar example can be found through the example

in Sport and technology
Open Access (free)
Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

the practices of judging the credibility of asylum requests in Brazil. Through ethnographic research with various Brazilian agencies involved in the asylum procedure, the chapter is concerned with how asylum cases come to be regarded as consistent or not; consistency being a requirement for granting asylum. Annemarie Mol’s work on ontological coordination is drawn on to understand how different enactments of an asylum case

in Security/ Mobility
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time

within crisis mapping projects. This has helped to show projects where there is stability and good reception of the map, as well as how maps have utility for short periods of time or specific groups of users. As Annemarie Mol and Marianne de Laet say of the fluid networks surrounding the technology of the Zimbabwe bush pump (Mol and de Laet, 2000), there is no binary assessment of whether these maps are successful or not. Rather the researcher allows h­ erself/ himself to be moved by them. Along these lines, I should acknowledge that the fluid mass of foam includes me

in Time for mapping