Open Access (free)
Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.

5 Non-​state actors and the quest for authority in Arctic governance The modern state, as discussed in Chapter 1, can be considered a relative newcomer to the cross-​border politics of the Arctic region. However, states have featured prominently in the preceding two chapters. We have come to see how advantageous positions earned by/​granted to states vis-​à-​vis other states matter for shaping the rules of the road in Arctic cooperative governance –​and ultimately shape outcomes. In this chapter, I seek to broaden the net to explore the positions of key non

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Theorising Arctic hierarchies

the changing nature of the post-​Cold War international system (multipolar, concentric, anarchic) and the jumbled and untidy geopolitical imaginings of a new, arguably more chaotic, world order. As discussed in Chapter 1, Arctic governance is marked by a number of initiatives that have been initially promoted by ‘non-​great-​power’ states in the international system (or indeed by indigenous peoples’ 58 Theorising Arctic hierarchies     59 organisations, NGOs and other sectors of civil society). These include ‘the Finnish Initiative’, which became the AEPS

in Arctic governance
New stories on rafted ice

environmental awareness (Epstein, 2008). This book is designed to give us insight into how power relations have been important to structuring and sustaining cross-​border Arctic cooperation and cooperative governance of the region. Taking a close look at power necessitates jostling and unpacking established narratives about regional history and key actors. This chapter, however, aims to provide readers less familiar with Arctic settings with important19background 20 Arctic governance and, therefore, draws upon established narratives and classifications that later chapters

in Arctic governance

Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. newgenrtpdf Figure 5  Map of North Circumpolar Region (polar projection). newgenrtpdf Figure 6  Map of a use-​based demarcation of the Arctic from the Pan Inuit Trails project. 38 Arctic governance early 2000s, but fell into disuse as China escalated its efforts to secure Arctic Council permanent observer status (see discussion below). The map has a flattened perspective allowing for a viewing of both poles at once. The boldest lines are not political boundaries, but rather potential transpolar shipping routes in bright

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
A power perspective on Arctic governance

Introduction: a power perspective on Arctic governance I have reached these lands but newly From an ultimate dim Thule –​ From a wild weird clime, that lieth, sublime, Out of Space –​out of Time. (Edgar Allan Poe, ‘Dream-​Land’ (1844)) From the days of the Greek cartographers dreaming about Ultima Thule at the edges of the known world, the cold reaches of the northern hemisphere have inspired grandiose caricatures of risk and opportunity. The region is often imagined from a distance as sublime, exceptional and prone to extremes. Out of space and out of time, as

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)

us to understand the performance of power in practice. This entails understanding power as produced through marshalling necessary resources to undergird a performance of dominance (or deference) –​and pulling off the performance in such a way that the audience recognises the performance as one of a competent actor. Repeated efforts at this kind of performance –​ or a 125 126 Arctic governance very successful one –​heighten the ability of actors to shape outcomes after their preferences (including furnishing a policy site with strongly anchored representations

in Arctic governance

norms exert influence over behaviour in cross-​border relations requires reconceptualising the space of global governance as more than a dynamic, inclusive, vast network of governance. Rather, we need to consider how delimited and ‘local’ the meeting places of cross-​border politics –​what we can term global governance policy fields –​frequently become. 83 84 Arctic governance This chapter examines Russia’s engagement in the Arctic Council over time to see how its preferences are met (or not), and discusses what this can tell us about the rules of the road in

in Arctic governance