Steve Sohmer

In 1767 Edward Capell recognized Phebe’s breathless exclamation in As You Like It 3.5,a Dead Shepheard, now I find thy saw of might, ‘Who ever lov’d, that lov’d not at first sight?’ (82–3) 1 as

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Author: Steve Sohmer

This book will come as a revelation to Shakespeare scholars everywhere. It reveals the identity of the playwright and Shakespeare’s colleague behind the mask of Jaques in As You Like It. It pinpoints the true first night of Twelfth Night and reveals why the play’s performance at the Inns of Court was a momentous occasion for shakespeare. It also the identities Quinapalus, the Vapians, Pigrogromitus and Feste, as well as the ‘Dark Lady’ of the Sonnets and the inspiration for Jessica in The Merchant of Venice. And it solves Shakespeare’s greatest riddle: the meaning of M.O.A.I. in Twelfth Night. In sum, this book reveals William Shakespeare as a far more personal writer than we have ever imagined.

Open Access (free)
Personal Shakespeare
Steve Sohmer

As You Like It as one of Harvey’s ‘wiser sort’ did, with ears and eyes tuned to catch every nuance, intimation, allusion, and innuendo of London life? Shakespeare’s auditors came to the theatre and thumbed his quartos with an awareness we can’t share. Clearly, their efforts at deciphering were not disappointed. What I have suggested throughout this book is that

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

. In December 1601 the company’s repertory included a number of luminous alternatives. Setting aside Shakespeare’s histories as long in the tooth and inappropriate for a festive evening, the company might have played Julius Caesar or an early Hamlet (neither a dainty dish to set before a Queen) or As You Like It , which I believe they had played before Elizabeth on

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

I’ve suggested that in As You Like It Shakespeare etched into Touchstone an effigy of Thomas Nashe. I will show that in Twelfth Night Shakespeare produced another, more highly developed portrait of Nashe as Feste – and thrust him back into conflict with his real-life nemesis Gabriel Harvey, whom Shakespeare cast as Malvolio – ‘He who

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

further meaning from [ M.O.A.I. ] are misplaced.’ 6 Elizabeth Donno gave the crux a wide birth, merely comparing Orlando’s ‘Thy huntress’ name that my full life doth sway’ ( As You Like It 3.2.10). 7 In 1984, Elam perceived ‘Malvolio’s hermeneutic labours as a parody of the earnest anagrammatic endeavours of Renaissance magi to discover the sacred Tetragrammaton’. 8

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

examine some of the personal tributes which dot Shakespeare’s plays, perhaps less elaborate than his celebration of Marlowe in As You Like It , but no less deeply felt. Notes 1 Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard, Shakespeare in Love , undated draft, www.imsdb.com (accessed 21 June 2016

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

man’. 54 The most famous early modern English rendering of the ages of man is of course in Shakespeare’s As You Like It , where, having declared that ‘all the world’s a stage’, Jaques describes seven ages of man, concluding: Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Sukanta Chaudhuri

substantial Italian line of the latter from the mid-sixteenth century, taking in Tasso’s Aminta (1573) and Giovanni Battista Guarini’s Il pastor fido (The Faithful Shepherd, 1590). Again, the influence spread to other languages. If Shakespeare’s As You Like It is the most celebrated instance in English, and The Winter’s Tale provides the best-known pastoral interlude, a line of plays typified by John Fletcher’s The Faithful Shepherdess (and continuing into Charles I’s reign) are closer to the Italian model. Pastoral romance and drama typically present a circular plot in

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Steve Sohmer

matters of state. Playwrights who transgressed the latter prohibition – for example, Jonson and Nashe with The Isle of Dogges in 1597 – wound up fined, jailed, or in self-imposed internal exile. Eventually, there were rules against profanity and taking the name of the Lord in vain (1606), which is perhaps why in the Folio As You Like It (1623) Rosalind uses the Latinate

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind