Open Access (free)
Dead bodies, evidence and the death march from Buchenwald to Dachau, April–May 1945
Christopher E. Mauriello

This article utilises the theoretical perspectives of the forensic turn to further expand our historical understandings and interpretations of the events of the Holocaust. More specifically, it applies a theory of the materialities of dead bodies to historically reconstruct and reinterpret the death march from Buchenwald to Dachau from 7 to 28 April 1945. It focuses on dead bodies as ‘evidence’, but explores how the evidential meanings of corpses along the death-march route evolved and changed during the march itself and in the aftermath of discovery by approaching American military forces. While drawing on theories of the evidential use of dead bodies, it remains firmly grounded in empirical historical research based on archival sources. The archives at the Buchenwald Concentration Camp contain eyewitness accounts and post-war trial testimony that enable a deeply contextualised ‘microhistory’ of the geography, movements, perpetrators, victims and events along this specific death march in April and May 1945. This ‘thick description’ provides the necessary context for a theoretical reading of the changing evidential meanings of dead bodies as the death march wove its way from Buchenwald to Dachau and the war and the Holocaust drew to an end.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
The tales destruction tells
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

sometimes played a part in the process of annihilation, this has not always, or everywhere, been the case, as the Rwandan genocide demonstrates. The industrialization of the destruction process can even be seen as an exception. The different ways in which bodies have been destroyed also raise the question of what happens to human remains. Bones, skulls, hair, and skin are sometimes put on display, as in Buchenwald or during the great famine in China, or simply left out in the open air, as was sometimes the case in post-Soviet Russia or in Cambodia.8 Exhibited, they can be

in Destruction and human remains
Open Access (free)
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

-​B elsen and Buchenwald by the photographers and came­ ramen of the American and British forces.16 The last three decades have consequently seen the production of numerous works of art that examine the place of corpses and human remains in societies marked by extreme violence. Among them is the work of Anselm Kiefer, who delves into the cannibalistic nature of Western societies in paintings such as Osiris and Isis (1985–​87) and the highly explicit and figurative work of the Belarusian painter Mikhail Savitsky, who reconstructs his experience of the Nazi extermination

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Machines of mass incineration in fact, fiction, and forensics
Robert Jan van Pelt

Topf & Söhne to supply ovens for four modern crematoria in Auschwitz-Birkenau (there were no crematoria in Belzec, Sobibor, and Treblinka, and the other concentration camps where crematoria were built, such as Dachau, Buchenwald, and Sachsenhausen, did not play an important part in the German genocide of the Jews).10 The crematoria in Auschwitz were necessary to allow the camp to operate both as an extermination camp and as a supply of labour to industries both DHR.indb 120 5/15/2014 12:51:14 PM Machines of mass incineration  121 in Auschwitz and, in 1944

in Destruction and human remains
Re-thinking Ludwik Fleck’s concept of the thought-collective according to the case of Serbian archaeology
Monika Milosavljević

a typhus epidemic. Fleck was arrested in 1942, along with his family and staff, and they were all deported to the concentration camp at Auschwitz. There, Fleck and his staff were forced to produce a vaccine against typhus for the German forces. In 1944, he was transferred to Buchenwald, where he continued to prepare typhus vaccine. It was only after the Second World War that he received affirmation for his work in the field of microbiology. He became an authority figure in the medical field, which drew attention away from his work on epistemology. In 1957 he

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Robert Boyce

, managed to escape. He and his brother, Samuel, arrested separately for acts of Resistance and later deported to Buchenwald, appeared before the court to recount the family’s story.39 Marie Reille, the Catholic wife of a French Jew, was also detained in Bordeaux and, despite the willingness of the Germans to allow her to remain behind, she was forced on board a convoy to Drancy on 21 September 1942 by one of Papon’s officials. Her journey eventually took her to Poland and through the gates of Auschwitz before the German authorities pulled her from the crowd of women and

in Domestic and international trials, 1700–2000
Forensic and archaeological approaches to locating the remains of Holocaust victims
Caroline Sturdy Colls

forced to bury the corpses.10 This took place at Dachau, Buchenwald, Nordhausen and Namering, and local people were forced to view the corpses, which were laid out in the camp grounds at the request of the American liberating forces.11 In many towns and villages, communities searched for the dead and funerary scenes were common sights in the places where the Nazis had carried out massacres of the local population. Some of these sites were marked but others were not. The scale of the crimes perpetrated during the Holocaust is also a reason why relatively few searches

in Human remains in society