The case of the management of the dead related to COVID-19
Ahmed Al-Dawoody

This article studies one of the humanitarian challenges caused by the COVID-19 crisis: the dignified handling of the mortal remains of individuals that have died from COVID-19 in Muslim contexts. It illustrates the discussion with examples from Sunni Muslim-majority states when relevant, such as Egypt, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco and Pakistan, and examples from English-speaking non-Muslim majority states such as the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada and Australia as well as Sri Lanka. The article finds that the case of the management of dead bodies of people who have died from COVID-19 has shown that the creativity and flexibility enshrined in the Islamic law-making logic and methodology, on the one hand, and the cooperation between Muslim jurists and specialised medical and forensic experts, on the other, have contributed to saving people’s lives and mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in Muslim contexts.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Justin A. Joyce

Recounting the failures of the United States to adequately address the COVID-19 pandemic, reflecting on the parade of mendacity that has encapsulated the 45th presidency, and interpreting Baldwin’s call to be responsible to our children, Justin A. Joyce introduces the sixth volume of James Baldwin Review.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

healthcare and comorbidities’. Intersectionality, Social Determinants and COVID-19 To achieve DfID’s vision and measure impact effectively, the document urges NGOs to advocate for and create programmes to ‘address structural conditions and root causes’ of mental ill-health. Yet, the ToC self-admittedly only ‘touches on’ how mental health is inextricably linked to other developmental goals – regrettable, given its clear intersectionality

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Fernando Espada

After three special issues of the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs – on humanitarianism and the end of liberal order, humanitarian security and humanitarian innovation – the first regular issue includes a range of articles touching on questions that at the time of writing are largely off the radar of global public attention. When the journal’s editorial board compiled the contributions to this issue, it could not have foreseen the first pandemic of the twenty-first century: Covid-19. The same eyes that now frantically pore over graphs showing the evolution

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

This is the second general issue of the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs , following in the wake of two themed issues on Extreme Violence, and Gender and Humanitarianism respectively. It comes at a time when COVID-19 has resulted in rising global inequalities, including those based on gender, and the spectre of famine has returned to public consciousness – for example, in northern Ethiopia. Gender and violence – the latter of a more indirect form – both feature in this issue, as do

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

and humanitarianism ( Medie and Kang, 2018 ). It would be remiss of me not to mention the context in which this issue was put together. Many have highlighted the gendered impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic ( Azcona et al. , 2020 ; Parry and Gordon, 2020 ; Wenham, Smith and Morgan, 2020 ; Wenham et al. , 2020 ), and the pandemic has also impacted this issue. Contributions which would have further enhanced this issue were delayed by the pressures of responding to the pandemic, whether in a professional or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

). Ritholtz , S. ( 2020 ), ' LGBTQ+ People Left Out by Exclusionary COVID-19 Aid Practices ', The New Humanitarian , 24 June , www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/06/24/LGBTQ-gender-coronavirus-discrimination-aid (accessed 30 August 2020 ). Roth , S. ( 2015 ), The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell and Peter Hailey

, frequently, the breakdown of institutions and social norms. Politically, it means a failure of governance – a failure to provide the most basic of protections. Technically, it has come to mean the simultaneous and unambiguous breaching of thresholds for food insecurity, malnutrition and mortality in a given location and time period for a population of at least 10,000 people ( IPC Global Partners, 2019 ). Globally, even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of acutely food-insecure people was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

); the COVID-19 pandemic only underlines how humanitarians, in our certainty that we can be solutions to crises of all kinds, can exhibit an inability or indeed unwillingness to perceive our own position within matrices of colonialism, white saviourism and gendered power relations – we can literally become the problem, bringing sickness with us from abroad to areas previously not affected by it. There is a clear need for a different framing of security threats based on a more

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Naomi Chambers and Jeremy Taylor

, attentiveness, empowerment, organisational competence and professional competence. We compare these themes with the case and evidence for patient-centred care outlined in Chapter 1 . We consider what the stories tell us about the things that patients value, the extent to which these things are put into practice, and what the obstacles are. We reflect on the five themes as the basis for a call to action for improvement. We discuss vital questions of context: in particular, straitened funding and workforce shortages in the NHS, and the experiences of COVID-19. Finally we touch

in Organising care around patients