Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

adoption in Canada is a question which you have better means of determining than I possess.’ 3 By 1840 there were four colonies in mainland British North America, clustered in the south-eastern corner of the vast Canadian land mass, the rest of which remained under the administration of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Representative government had been introduced during the last quarter of the eighteenth century

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
‘A vote the same as any other person’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

nations as White. In post-confederation Canada the franchise was seldom an issue for debate. The need to bring together disparate colonies, the financing and construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the establishing of systems of governance in the old Hudson’s Bay territories were the issues which preoccupied the government in Ottawa in its early nation-building years

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

In the late summer of 1928, twenty-five young women aged 17–18 years, representatives of sixteen élite English public schools, 1 assembled with their parents on the departure platform at Euston Station in London, to begin a two-month tour of Canada. From London they took a train to Liverpool, and then went by sea to Canada. Figure 4.1 outlines the Canadian itinerary

in Female imperialism and national identity
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

During the Depression and the Second World War the IODE’s vision for Canada was influenced by Britain’s weakening position in relation to a strengthening Canada. Although the influence of investments and popular culture from the USA was increasing at that time, British immigrants were still valued as superior to those of other races and the IODE promoted its own version of

in Female imperialism and national identity
Sarah Cormode

24 Aboriginal transitions research project in British Columbia, Canada Sarah Cormode Context The project was initiated by the University of Victoria, Office of CommunityBased Research (OCBR), the University of Victoria – Office of Indigenous Affairs (INAF) and Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association (IAHLA), who jointly responded to a call for proposals issued by the provincial government for research projects considering various ‘transition’ experiences of students on the journey to post-secondary education. The three partners proposed to jointly

in Knowledge, democracy and action
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Author: Katie Pickles

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Indigenous people in British settler colonies, 1830s–1910

This book focuses on the ways in which the British settler colonies of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa treated indigenous peoples in relation to political rights, commencing with the imperial policies of the 1830s and ending with the national political settlements in place by 1910. Drawing on a wide range of sources, its comparative approach provides an insight into the historical foundations of present-day controversies in these settler societies.

The case of the management of the dead related to COVID-19
Ahmed Al-Dawoody

This article studies one of the humanitarian challenges caused by the COVID-19 crisis: the dignified handling of the mortal remains of individuals that have died from COVID-19 in Muslim contexts. It illustrates the discussion with examples from Sunni Muslim-majority states when relevant, such as Egypt, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco and Pakistan, and examples from English-speaking non-Muslim majority states such as the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada and Australia as well as Sri Lanka. The article finds that the case of the management of dead bodies of people who have died from COVID-19 has shown that the creativity and flexibility enshrined in the Islamic law-making logic and methodology, on the one hand, and the cooperation between Muslim jurists and specialised medical and forensic experts, on the other, have contributed to saving people’s lives and mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in Muslim contexts.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

the development of NGOs. So, since you’ve raised the issue of NGOs and you’ve all worked from different sources, let us discuss the range and types of non-governmental organisations you have all worked on and the kind of records and sources you have used to engage with the history of their humanitarian work. Arua: Well, I used the UK’s National Archives at Kew, Nigerian National Archives, Enugu, Canadian Archives [Library and Archives Canada/Bibliothèque et Archives Canada

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

evaluations which are done are often not available to the public. This result highlighted how a synthesis of existing evaluations may support these organisations to make better-informed decisions. Thereafter, the following steps of identifying evaluation reports from South Sudan were undertaken, which were more informal in nature. Requests for evaluation reports were sent to two mailing lists of development practitioners (Pelican, which is UK-based, and the Canadian Association of International Development Professionals). This process resulted in the sharing of 15 reports

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs