Open Access (free)
A new labour market segmentation approach

This book presents new theories and international empirical evidence on the state of work and employment around the world. Changes in production systems, economic conditions and regulatory conditions are posing new questions about the growing use by employers of precarious forms of work, the contradictory approaches of governments towards employment and social policy, and the ability of trade unions to improve the distribution of decent employment conditions. Designed as a tribute to the highly influential contributions of Jill Rubery, the book proposes a ‘new labour market segmentation approach’ for the investigation of issues of job quality, employment inequalities, and precarious work. This approach is distinctive in seeking to place the changing international patterns and experiences of labour market inequalities in the wider context of shifting gender relations, regulatory regimes and production structures.

Introduction and overview
Damian Grimshaw, Colette Fagan, Gail Hebson and Isabel Tavora

and technology investment ÿ Tax penalties for high labour turnover ÿ Social value procurement practices Theoretical implications for policy and practice Likely characteristics of inequalities Table 1.1  Three theoretical approaches to understanding inequalities in work and employment ii) Feminist – Persistent gender division of socio-economics domestic and care work – Interplay of workplace and household power ­relations shapes good/bad job segmentation – Gendered wage practices target first and second earners – Economic cycles (booms and busts) have

in Making work more equal
Can commodification of labour be self-limiting?
Francesca Bettio and Alberto Mazzon

provide below intersects with the scholarly work of Rubery in at least two respects. As noted, the main intersection is with her research on the consequences of the demise of the standard employment contract. An additional intersection concerns the shape such a demise can take, especially in feminised areas such as care work. Rubery and her co-authors coined the term ‘fragmented time practices’ (see also Chapter 6) to group different forms of de-­commodification within the care sector. Towards the end of the chapter we explore similarities and differences with the

in Making work more equal
Open Access (free)
Caring performance, performing care
Amanda Stuart Fisher

and Educational Environment ( 1992 ), for example, Pam Smith examines the caring work of nursing as a mode of emotional labour. Positioning care as a mode of professional labour that incorporates practical skill and various modes of empathic engagement with others, Smith’s thesis draws on Arlie Hochschild’s theorisation around ‘emotional labour’ as developed in her book, The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling ( 2012 ), where she considers the unacknowledged caring work of air hostesses. The emotional labour of caring has also been explored in other

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
A practical politics of care
Caoimhe McAvinchey

Tronto notes, where care work is paid, it is often gendered, raced and classed and that ‘those who are least well off in society are disproportionately those who do the work of caring, and that the best-off members of society often use their positions of superiority to pass caring work off to others’ ([1993] 2009 : 113). This marginalisation and devaluing of care work further facilitates the construction of ‘otherness’ – of both the carer and cared for – through power and privilege. Tronto disaggregates the idea of care from women’s work and women’s morality and

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

that Third Wayers ignore the importance of care, but even at the rhetorical level the support offered is often qualified by the insinuation that care work is not real work. Take, as one example, Glennerster’s (1999: 37) observation that, ‘Paid work brings dignity and respect. That does not preclude us from also giving dignity and worth to non-paid work. But to deny paid work or to encourage people to live without it is to deny a main source of dignity in our Western capitalist industrialised world’. What this does is to regard care work as equivalent to involuntary

in After the new social democracy
Tony Fitzpatrick

to be the cure. So, over the last couple of chapters I have stressed the importance of care work and sustainability, on the basis that these continue to be underemphasised by social democrats, old as well as new. In addition to distributive justice, these are the philosophical foundations of an ecowelfare politics, of a post-productivist social democracy. We have already addressed the main features of distributive justice in Chapter 2 and so our task here, in the following two sections, is to give an account of care and sustainability. I will then provide a simple

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

work, for example, is having significant implications for paid and unpaid domestic and care work. Indeed, an exploration of the roles and functions of unemployment in a GPE is also fundamental to thinking about work and the governmentality of work. As the ILO’s ‘Decent Work’ agenda reminds us ‘almost everyone works, but not everyone is employed’ (1999b: 3). Societies face varied challenges and questions in their framing of future modes and forms of work. This will include necessary reflection on the function that unemployment or semi-employment may Amoore_Global_08

in Globalisation contested
Acceptance, critique and the bigger picture
Anne B. Ryan

‘time off’. At the same time, accounts recognise that the emphasis placed on paid work has meant less time for interpersonal relationships outside the job and that, as a consequence, many social structures are weak, leisure is often lonely and boring, and social and personal health can suffer. The reality discourses surrounding paid work also see jobs as the means by which people are socially included and good citizens, and so ignore the fact that many people in high-status, high-paid jobs do not have the time or inclination to do the caring work that builds a strong

in The end of Irish history?
Andrew C. Grundy

investigators or study co-applicants. As principal investigators they might take the lead in managing, designing and carrying out a study, or in forming a collaborative team, in what is sometimes called user-led or usercontrolled research. The EQUIP study was conducted by a mix of researchers from different backgrounds. The different contributions that service users and carers made to the EQUIP research programme are shown in Figure 1. As you can see, service users and carers worked in many different roles and had a range of different experiences, and you will learn more

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers