Open Access (free)
Frontier patterns old and new
Philip Nanton

State marginalization and the region as hinterland The anglophone Caribbean region has two distinct faces. One face, the one shown to the outside world, suggests ‘everything cool’, ease and even contentment. Democratic traditions (for the most part) are upheld, the sun shines, the rules of cricket are obeyed, tourist services are friendly and order is maintained. The

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Louis James

At a Conference of the Caribbean Artists Movement (CAM) held at the University of Kent in 1969, C. L. R. James spoke with typical energy of his experience of growing up in Trinidad. I didn’t get literature from the mango-tree, or bathing on the shore and getting the sun of the colonial countries

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

approach to development with some long-standing laissez-faire principles. Two wider political issues made Colonial Office attempts to persuade the Caribbean colonies to follow its preferred routes to industrialisation difficult, however. The increasing political autonomy of governments in the Caribbean region meant that Britain could not merely instruct its West Indian possessions to follow its edicts. In addition, it became clear that in the post-war world, the US hoped to shape development across the Caribbean along lines that it found conducive to its own interests

in Science at the end of empire
Author: Philip Nanton

The book argues that the frontier, usually associated with the era of colonial conquest, has great, continuing and under explored relevance to the Caribbean region. Identifying the frontier as a moral, ideational and physical boundary between what is imagined as civilization and wilderness, the book seeks to extend frontier analysis by focusing on the Eastern Caribbean multi island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The continuing relevance of the concept of frontier, and allied notions of civilization and wilderness, are illuminated through an analysis of the ways in which SVG is perceived and experienced by both outsiders to the society and its insiders. Using literary sources, biographies and autobiography, the book shows how St. Vincent is imagined and made sense of as a modern frontier; a society in the balance between an imposed civilized order and an untameable wild that always encroaches, whether in the form of social dislocation, the urban presence of the ‘Wilderness people’ or illegal marijuana farming in the northern St. Vincent hills. The frontier as examined here has historically been and remains very much a global production. Simultaneously, it is argued that contemporary processes of globalization shape the development of tourism and finance sectors, as well as patterns of migration, they connect to shifting conceptions of the civilized and the wild, and have implications for the role of the state and politics in frontier societies.

Experts and the development of the British Caribbean, 1940–62
Author: Sabine Clarke

This book produces a major rethinking of the history of development after 1940 through an exploration of Britain’s ambitions for industrialisation in its Caribbean colonies. Industrial development is a neglected topic in histories of the British Colonial Empire, and we know very little of plans for Britain’s Caribbean colonies in general in the late colonial period, despite the role played by riots in the region in prompting an increase in development spending. This account shows the importance of knowledge and expertise in the promotion of a model of Caribbean development that is best described as liberal rather than state-centred and authoritarian. It explores how the post-war period saw an attempt by the Colonial Office to revive Caribbean economies by transforming cane sugar from a low-value foodstuff into a lucrative starting compound for making fuels, plastics and medical products. In addition, it shows that as Caribbean territories moved towards independence and America sought to shape the future of the region, scientific and economic advice became a key strategy for the maintenance of British control of the West Indian colonies. Britain needed to counter attempts by American-backed experts to promote a very different approach to industrial development after 1945 informed by the priorities of US foreign policy.

Editor: Bill Schwarz

Caribbean migration to Britain brought many new things—new music, new foods, new styles. It brought new ways of thinking too. This book explores the intellectual ideas that the West Indians brought with them to Britain. It shows that, for more than a century, West Indians living in Britain developed a dazzling intellectual critique of the codes of Imperial Britain. Chapters discuss the influence of, amongst others, C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul. The contributors draw from many different disciplines to bring alive the thought and personalities of the figures they discuss, providing a picture of intellectual developments in Britain from which we can still learn much. The introduction argues that the recovery of this Caribbean past, on the home territory of Britain itself, reveals much about the prospects of multiracial Britain.

An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

new US strategy for international cooperation and multilateralism? CA: Well, it is a difficult moment for international cooperation. It is possible to argue that the liberalism of the old order was a veneer that permitted a form of capitalist domination. But, regardless, many people benefited from this veneer. There were opportunities for organisations like UNICEF and Save the Children. And for Brazil, too. When I was foreign minister, I was able to establish triangular cooperation programmes with the US in Africa and in the Caribbean. In my

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

/Pacific region, Europe and the Americas/Caribbean. Interviewees were primarily field-based humanitarian actors who have served in senior- or mid-level management or operational roles in humanitarian response. The gender breakdown of the interviewee pool is 78 male, 40 female. The interviewee pool consists largely of international staff – indeed, only eight interviewees were national staff – a limitation, given that national staff constitute the vast majority of the humanitarian workforce and since they are also disproportionately affected by security incidents. Nevertheless

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

affected number from the EM-DAT database includes injured and homeless Although the overall figures provide a persuasive argument for questioning the dominance of structural safety as the central focus of post-disaster reconstruction, closer examination suggests that a contextual nuance is needed. The figures show that rebuilding houses that are strong and safe in an earthquake-prone region is more important than storm-proof housing in the Philippines or the Caribbean. This should come as no surprise: earthquakes happen without warning and with catastrophic

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

. Fiddian-Qasmiyeh , E. ( 2015 ), South–South Educational Migration, Humanitarianism and Development: Views from the Caribbean, North Africa and the Middle East ( Oxford : Routledge ). Fiddian-Qasmiyeh , E. ( 2016a ), ‘ Repressentations of Displacement in the Middle East ’, Public Culture , 28 : 3 , 457 – 73 , doi: 10.1215/08992363-3511586 . Fiddian-Qasmiyeh , E. ( 2016b ), ‘ Refugee–Refugee Relations in Contexts of Overlapping Displacement ’, International

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs